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boost::lexical_cast is a great tool but in my application I ran into a limitation in string -> bool conversion that is bugging me. I need to convert all strings like "0", "false" and "FALSE" into false and "1", "true" and "TRUE" into true.

boost::lexical_cast only support conversion from/to "0" and "1". So my idea was to write my own conversion function which seems to work fine:

bool str_to_bool(const std::string &str)
{
    if(str == "1" || str == "true" || str == "TRUE")
        return true;
    else if(str == "0" || str == "false" || str == "FALSE")
        return false;
    else
        throw std::runtime_error("Bad cast from std::string to bool!");
}

Now I wan to write a wrapper round boost::lexical_cast and write my own template specializations for it. Here is what I've got so far:

template<typename Target, typename Source>
inline Target my_cast(const Source& src)
{
    return boost::lexical_cast<Target>(src);
}

template<>
inline bool my_cast(const std::string& src)
{
    return str_to_bool(src);
}

This works great for integers or std::string but obviously fails for string literals or character pointers:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::cout << my_cast<bool>(1) << std::endl;                    //OK
    std::cout << my_cast<bool>(std::string("true")) << std::endl;  //OK
    std::cout << my_cast<bool>("true") << std::endl;               //Fail! 

    return 0;
}

So I tried to write another specialization for char * but it fails to compile!

//does not compile!
template<>
inline bool my_cast(const char*& src)
{
    return str_to_bool(src);
}

What is the correct way to support both std::string and char *?

EDIT 1: the title was stupid. Fixed it.

EDIT 2: I borrowed a solution from boost itself. Posted as a new answer.

share|improve this question

You need to take a const char*, not a const char*&. The mutable lvalue reference here will only bind to an lvalue, whereas the decay from the array type that the string literal actually is will only produce an rvalue const char*, to which you can only bind a const reference.

share|improve this answer
    
hmmm, changing it to my_cast(const char* src) does not compile either. Changing it to my_cast(char * const& src) compiles but does not get called... – AlefSin Jul 2 '11 at 21:23
    
@AlefSin: You need to post the error messages. – Puppy Jul 2 '11 at 21:51
    
if I just write my_cast(const char * src) I get 'bool my_cast(const char *)' is not a specialization of a function template. The way Kerrek SB wrote it works however. – AlefSin Jul 2 '11 at 21:57
    
@AlefSin: That's because you've gotten the syntax for specializations wrong. You need to look those up separately. – Puppy Jul 3 '11 at 10:10
    
Well, I knew it got it wrong that's why I asked the question! Anyway, I managed to fix it as explained in my answer. – AlefSin Jul 3 '11 at 12:25

If you say this:

template<>
inline bool my_cast<bool, std::string>(std::string const & src)
{
  return str_to_bool(src);
}

template<>
inline bool my_cast<bool, const char *>(const char * const & src)
{
  return str_to_bool(src);
}

Then at least you can make the following work:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  const char * const q = "true";
  std::cout << my_cast<bool>(q) << std::endl;               //Fail!
  return 0;
}

Update: Voila:

typedef char FT[5];

template<>
inline bool my_cast<bool, FT>(const FT & src)
{
  return str_to_bool(src);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great. I figured that out too. On VS2010 it compiles even without specifying the template arguments. However, it calls the non-specialized version! – AlefSin Jul 2 '11 at 21:30
    
Any ideas how to fix it for the string literal? – AlefSin Jul 2 '11 at 21:32
    
@AlefShin: Check it out! – Kerrek SB Jul 2 '11 at 21:34
    
hehehe nice trick! I guess I should add another one for char[2] case ("0" and "1"). But is there a general way to do that? (OK, I know, I should study lexical_cast itself). – AlefSin Jul 2 '11 at 21:37
    
@AS: I had wanted to make it a template on the array size, but you can't partially-specialize functions. Would have to wrap this in a class maybe. – Kerrek SB Jul 2 '11 at 21:38
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a solution that works. I got the idea from boost::lexical_cast itself:

template<class T>
struct array_to_pointer_decay
{
    typedef T type;
};

template<class T, std::size_t N>
struct array_to_pointer_decay<T[N]>
{
    typedef const T * type;
};

template<typename Target, typename Source>
Target my_cast_internal(const Source& s)
{
    return boost::lexical_cast<Target>(s);
}

template<>
inline bool my_cast_internal(const std::string& src)
{
    return str_to_bool(src);
}

template<>
inline bool my_cast_internal(const char* const& src)
{
    return str_to_bool(src);
}

template<typename Target, typename Source>
inline Target my_cast(const Source& s)
{
    typedef typename array_to_pointer_decay<Source>::type src;

    return my_cast_internal<Target, src>(s);
}

The main challenge is to deal with array types. The array_to_pointer_decay converts any array type to the corresponding pointer type. The rest is easy now.

share|improve this answer

Let me add this as a new answer... a type-erasing version!

For C++98/03

/* Core caster */
bool str_to_bool(const std::string &str)
{
  if(str == "1" || str == "true" || str == "TRUE")
    return true;
  else if(str == "0" || str == "false" || str == "FALSE")
    return false;
  else
    throw std::runtime_error("Bad cast from std::string to bool!");
}


/* Type erasing scaffold */

struct TypeEraseBase
{
  virtual bool cast() const = 0;
  virtual ~TypeEraseBase() { }
};

template <typename T>
struct TypeEraseImpl : public TypeEraseBase
{
  TypeEraseImpl(const T & tt) : t(tt) { }
  virtual bool cast() const { return boost::lexical_cast<T>(t); }
private:
  const T & t;
};

/* Specializations go here */

template <>
struct TypeEraseImpl<std::string> : public TypeEraseBase
{
  TypeEraseImpl(const std::string & tt) : t(tt) { }
  virtual bool cast() const { return str_to_bool(t); }
private:
  const std::string & t;
};

template <size_t N>
struct TypeEraseImpl<char[N]> : public TypeEraseBase
{
  TypeEraseImpl(const char (& tt)[N]) : t(tt) { }
  virtual bool cast() const { return str_to_bool(std::string(t)); }
private:
  const char (& t)[N];
};

template <>
struct TypeEraseImpl<const char *> : public TypeEraseBase
{
  TypeEraseImpl(const char * const & tt) : t(tt) { }
  virtual bool cast() const { return str_to_bool(std::string(t)); }
private:
  const char * const & t;
};


/* User interface class */

struct my_cast
{
  template <typename T> my_cast(const T & tt)
  : pt(new TypeEraseImpl<T>(tt))
  {
  }

  ~my_cast() { if (pt) delete pt; }

  inline bool cast() const { return pt->cast(); }

private:
  const TypeEraseBase * const pt;
};


// Usage example

int main()
{
  const char * const q = "true";
  std::cout << my_cast(1).cast() << std::endl;
  std::cout << my_cast(std::string("true")).cast() << std::endl;
  std::cout << my_cast("true").cast() << std::endl;
  std::cout << my_cast(q).cast() << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

Type-traited version, templated return type

#include <string>
#include <stdexcept>
#include <iostream>
#include <ostream>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>

template <typename T> struct is_string : std::false_type { };
template <> struct is_string<std::string> : std::true_type { };
template <> struct is_string<const char *> : std::true_type { };
template <std::size_t N> struct is_string<char[N]> : std::true_type { };


/* The actual caster class */

template <typename T, bool B> struct to_bool
{
  static inline bool cast(const T & t)
  {
    return boost::lexical_cast<T>(t);
  }
};

template <typename T> struct to_bool<T, true>
{
  static inline bool cast(const T & t)
  {
    const std::string str(t);
    if(str == "1" || str == "true" || str == "TRUE")
      return true;
    else if(str == "0" || str == "false" || str == "FALSE")
      return false;
    else
      throw std::runtime_error("Bad cast from std::string to bool!");
  }
};


/* Type erasing helper class */

template <typename Target>
struct TypeEraseBase
{
  virtual Target cast() const = 0;
  virtual ~TypeEraseBase() { }
};

template <typename T, typename Target>
struct TypeEraseImpl : public TypeEraseBase<Target>
{
  TypeEraseImpl(const T & tt) : t(tt) { }
  virtual Target cast() const { return boost::lexical_cast<T>(t); }
private:
  const T & t;
};

template <typename T>
struct TypeEraseImpl<T, bool> : public TypeEraseBase<bool>
{
  TypeEraseImpl(const T & tt) : t(tt) { }
  virtual bool cast() const { return to_bool<T, is_string<T>::value>::cast(t); }
private:
  const T & t;
};


/* User interface class */

template <typename Target>
struct my_cast
{
  template <typename T> my_cast(const T & tt)
    : pt(new TypeEraseImpl<T, Target>(tt)) { }

  ~my_cast() { if (pt) delete pt; }

  inline Target cast() const { return pt->cast(); }

private:
  const TypeEraseBase<Target> * const pt;
};

template <typename Target>
std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream & stream, const my_cast<Target> & c)
{ return stream << c.cast(); }


/* Usage */

int main()
{
  const char * const q = "true";
  std::cout << my_cast<bool>(1) << std::endl;
  std::cout << my_cast<bool>(std::string("true")) << std::endl;
  std::cout << my_cast<bool>("true") << std::endl;
  std::cout << my_cast<bool>(q) << std::endl;

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
WoW, I need read through it slowly to understand it. – AlefSin Jul 2 '11 at 22:15
    
OK, I guess I understand it. However this is not the right solution: it does not extend boost::lexical_cast in the sense that it only works for a fixed Target type (bool). I want to keep all other conversions that boost::lexical_cast does and just modify the way it work for a special case (i.e. string -> bool). Btw, Look at my own answer below. – AlefSin Jul 2 '11 at 22:24
    
@AlefSin: OK, I added a type-traited version. It actually works in C++98 after all (you just have to define true_type and false_type. Making the return type bool parametric should be quite possible. – Kerrek SB Jul 2 '11 at 22:35
    
@AlefSin: You could add a <template Target> everywhere if you wanted. We could also add overloads for operator<< to get rid of the tedious .cast() call. – Kerrek SB Jul 2 '11 at 22:38
1  
@AlefSin: Yes, of course, in your case the direct overloads are the most straight-forward solution, and decaying the type is a good idea. I updated my code to have parametric return type now, and the stream operator is overloaded, too. The moral advantage is that you could in principle add types via traits without needing to know the implementation (e.g. when adding wide char support?). – Kerrek SB Jul 2 '11 at 22:52

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