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This seems like a very mysterious part of PHP to me, and I was wondering if someone could clarify because the manual doesn't seem to include this (or I just couldn't find it anywhere).

What would some of these things return?

if($c = mysql_connect($host, $user, $pass)){
 echo 'Success';
}else{
 echo 'Failure';
}

Would this always echo 'Success' because $c is successfully assigned to true or false? I'm wondering if I can do this or if I have to define $c on the previous line.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
mysql_connect returns either an object or false. $c in this case will have the MySql object on success and a boolean false on failure. – Adrian World Jul 2 '11 at 23:53
up vote 7 down vote accepted

It is mentioned in Assignment Operators:

The value of an assignment expression is the value assigned. That is, the value of "$a = 3" is 3.

So $c = ... will result in true if true is assigned to $c and in false if false is assigned.

That is also the reason why iterating over query results

while(($row = mysql_fetch_array(...)))

works.

share|improve this answer

When in doubt, build a test-case!

Build a test-case:

if ( $c = true ) {
  echo 'Success';
} else {
  echo 'No Success';
}

Run this online: http://codepad.org/jxylNzOu

You'll note that the first block will only be executed if the conditions turn up true (or what PHP evaluates as true when asked), so it's not asking if a value was successfully applied to $c, but rather whether the value applied to $c is true.

Regarding your specific example...

If your case, where you're attempting to open a connection to MySQL, $c will be true if the connection is made, resulting in the first block of the if-statement being ran. Otherwise, if no connection is made, $c will be false, making the condition of the if-statement false, resulting in the running of the else block.

According to the documentation for mysql_connect(), one of two things can be returned from this function.

  1. A MySQL Link Identifier (if a connection is made)
  2. FALSE, indicating a failure to make a connection.

So there's no difference between the following code examples

$conn = mysql_connect( $host, $user, $pass );
if ( $conn ) { /*...*/ }

And

if ( $conn = mysql_connect( $host, $user, $pass ) {
  /*...*/
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Nitpick: $c will be a resource if the connection was made, which evaluates to true. – deceze Jul 2 '11 at 23:40
1  
Actually $c will not be true but will be a connection resource. Better to say $c will be !== FALSE in case of success or FALSE on failure – Francesco Laurita Jul 2 '11 at 23:41
    
+1 to the both of you; you're both technically correct :) I'm aware that an actual boolean isn't returned on success, but that when evaluated a valid link identifier triggers the true results as opposed to the false results. – Sampson Jul 2 '11 at 23:44

It does not always echo 'Success'. PHP first assigns the result of mysql_connect to $to then evaluates boolean value of $to. But it's better to use this way to ensure the understandability:

$c = mysql_connect($host, $user, $pass)
if($to) {
    echo 'Success';
} else{
    echo 'Failure';
}
share|improve this answer

PHP is a "weakly typed" language which means php doesn't require (nor support it for that matter) explicit type declaration of variables.

Pay attention to consufe or evaluate 0 1 as true/false (boolean value)

Take this case as sample:

$s = "0"; //String s = '0'
$res = strstr($s,'0'); //Search the character zero into the string $s
if ($res){
  echo "Zero found!";
}else{
  echo "Zero not found!"
}
//Hey!! Whats up!!?? Zero is not found!

This is because zero, which is the returned value of the function strstr, is evaluated as FALSE producing in some cases unexpected results.

The correct way is to use the Not Identical operator !== where value and type is compared

The previous example should be:

$s = "0"; //String s = '0'
$res = strstr($s,'0'); //Search the character zero into the string $s
if ($res !== FALSE){//Check for value AND type
  echo "Zero found!";
}else{
  echo "Zero not found!"
}
//yeah now it works!

So in your case I would write the if statement as:

if(($c = mysql_connect($host, $user, $pass)) !== FALSE){
 echo 'Success';
}else{
 echo 'Failure';
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Those are quite separate issues from what the OP is asking. strstr may return a boolean false or success values that may evaluate to false. mysql_connect doesn't have that problem, it'll return a resource which evaluates to true on success or a boolean false on failure. – deceze Jul 3 '11 at 0:32
    
Yes I agree, just to clarify that the if-statement must be written paying attention about the returning value and type of the function – Francesco Laurita Jul 3 '11 at 0:40

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