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The assignment is to have the user enter 10 sets of initials and 10 sets of scores and store them in an array named 'Player'.

Below I will show the code I have created.

My problem at the moment is that when I print the array to the console window, it shows only the last set of scores and initials entered.

I've tried various options to get my array to store ten sets, but I'm having difficulty.

Problem #1: Can only store one set of initials and scores in the array. Need 10 sets.

Problem #2: Only one set is printed, and that is the last ones entered.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace HighScores
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string nInitials;

        int nScore;

        int counter = 0;

        do
        {
            Console.Write("Please enter your initials:");
            nInitials = Convert.ToString(Console.ReadLine());

            Console.Write("Please enter your score:");
            nScore = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

            counter++;
        }
        while (counter <= 2);

        for(int counter2 = 0; counter <= 2; counter2++)
        {
        Player[] myPlayerArray = new Player[3];

        Player[] myPlayer = 
           {
              new Player(nInitials, nScore)
           };

            foreach (var value in myPlayer)
                    {
                    Console.WriteLine("{0}", myPlayer[ counter2 ]);
                }
            }

#if DEBUG
        Console.ReadLine();
#endif

    }//end main

}//end class

public class Player
{

    public string initials { get; set; }

    public int score { get; set; }

    public Player(string pInitials, int pScore)
    {
        initials = pInitials;

        score = pScore;

    }

public override string  ToString()
    {
return string.Format("{0}, {1}", score, initials);
    }

}//end class Player
}//end namespace
share|improve this question
    
Stop using var in places you don't need to. That's not what it's for. If your professor told you to use it, remind him that he doesn't know what he's talking about and then if he still insists, use it in this manner only until you graduate. –  Shirik Jul 3 '11 at 1:29
4  
@Shirik: what's wrong with the single usage of var in this code? What is var for? Can you be sure that the professor "doesn't know what he's talking about"? Are you sure you know what you're talking about? –  spender Jul 3 '11 at 1:34
    
@spender In my experience people that use var in places where it is unnecessary tend to do it frequently. That's a problem. The whole reason var was necessary was because of anonymous types that could not be stored. The compiler could figure it out, though, so var works great for that purpose. But for cases like it is used here, it only makes reading code harder. Throw those in many places across a file (like many professors are teaching today) and all that happens is learning how to write unreadable code. Catching it early is the easiest way to fix it. –  Shirik Jul 3 '11 at 1:40
    
var is for 1. When you can't say the type. 2. When you trust the compiler to infer the type. The use of var in the original code is not case 1. Students haven't built the trust with the compiler to use case 2. –  David B Jul 3 '11 at 1:47
    
@Shirik: It would definitely be worth taking a read of Eric Lippert's recent article on the subject of var. blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/04/20/… Agreed, he's not a professor, but there's not really any higher authority on the matter :) –  spender Jul 4 '11 at 14:44

2 Answers 2

From the code snippet I pasted below, it's pretty obvious that whenever you read another initials/score set from the console you are discarding the previous result. You need to add a line of code after the nscore = line that creates a new player object and stores it in your array, otherwise the values of nInitials and nScore will be discarded the next time the loop runs.

    do
    {
        Console.Write("Please enter your initials:");
        nInitials = Convert.ToString(Console.ReadLine());

        Console.Write("Please enter your score:");
        nScore = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

        counter++;
    }
    while (counter <= 2);
share|improve this answer
namespace eheeeeeeeeeeeee
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Player[] players=new Player[10];
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                string tempName;
                int tempScore;

                Console.Write("Please enter your initials:");
                tempName = Convert.ToString(Console.ReadLine());

                Console.Write("Please enter your score:");
                tempScore = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

                players[i]=new Player(tempName,tempScore);

            }

            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(players[i].ToString());
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }


    public class Player
    {

        public string initials { get; set; }

        public int score { get; set; }

        public Player(string pInitials, int pScore)
        {
            initials = pInitials;
            score = pScore;

        }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return string.Format("{0}, {1}", score, initials);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@David I almost had it figured out before this last answer... @user672117: I appreciate the solution, but I would have preferred guidance instead. I will not submit my assignment until I fully understand how this works. I will not learn anything just by copying and pasting ;) Ty again everyone for the quick responses! (And I will try to avoid overusing var =X ) –  Joshua Jul 3 '11 at 2:02
    
I think that u should read about basics of C# and OOP ... –  user672117 Jul 3 '11 at 2:07

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