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Is it possible (or how) to create a mechanism (in Linux X11, C++) that works like a global hook in windows (SetWindowsHookEx())?

I would like to be able to catch the key event but with the possibility of further propagation. I'm trying to use a XGrabKey solution (like in xbindkeys) but when I set capturing the key event, this event is "consumed".

Requirements for this mechanism are the following:

  1. Global / system-wide - catching events regardless of the window that has focus
  2. The possibility of "catch-hold" and "catch-pass through"
  3. It must be quite fast

Sample code looks like this:

bool myFlagIsSet = false;
XEvent event;
while (true) {
    while (XPending(display) > 0) {
        usleep(SLEEP_TIME);
    }

    XNextEvent(display, &event);
    switch (e.type) {
        case KeyPress:
            if (myFlagIsSet) {
                //do not propagate
            }
            // propagate
            break;
        case KeyRelease:
            if (myFlagIsSet) {
                //do not propagate
            }
            // propagate
            break;
    }
}

On Windows I simply wrote:

if(event.isConsumed()) {
    return LRESULT(1);
}
//...
return CallNextHookEx(hookHandle, nCode, wParam, lParam);

I've also tried using XUngrabKey and XSendEvent:

switch (event.type) {
    case KeyPress:
        if (myFlagIsSet) {
            //do not propagate
        }
        // propagate
        XUngrabKey(...);
        XSendEvent(..., &event);
        XGrabKey(...);
        break;
    case KeyRelease:
        ...
    }

Unfortunately XSendEvent for unknown reasons to me - do not send this event even if XGrabKey line is commented.

Is it possible to successfully complete this approach?

Please suggest some other approach if I am condemned to failure

EDIT

I would like to implement this on Ubuntu Gnome using Compiz Window Manager

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This functionality will depend on the window manager/desktop environment you're using. –  Flimzy Jul 3 '11 at 1:35
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4 Answers 4

XSendEvent() probably does send it; but as it's widely regarded as a security hole, most programs ignore UI events with the send_event flag set.

The standard X11 protocol doesn't allow this. The XInput 2.0 extension might, but I doubt it; while Windows assumes a single event queue that every program listens to, so that a program can intercept an event and prevent it from being sent down the queue to other listeners, every X11 client has its own independent queue and all clients that register interest in an event receive an independent copy of it in their queue. This means that under normal circumstances it's impossible for an errant program to block other programs from running; but it also means that, for those times when a client must block other clients, it must do a server grab to prevent the server from processing events for any other client.

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Use XTestFakeKeyEvent() from the XTest extension library to propagate fake key press / release events.

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no idea if this helps, but I just found this in some code:



    void XFakeKeypress(Display *display, int keysym)
    { 
       XKeyEvent event;                     
       Window current_focus_window;         
       int current_focus_revert;

       XGetInputFocus(/* display = */ display, /* focus_return = */ 
          ¤t_focus_window, /* revert_to_return = */ ¤t_focus_revert);

       event.type = /* (const) */ KeyPress;
       event.display = display;
       event.window = current_focus_window;
       event.root = DefaultRootWindow(/* display = */ display);
       event.subwindow = /* (const) */ None;
       event.time = 1000 * time(/* tloc = */ NULL);
       event.x = 0;
       event.y = 0;
       event.x_root = 0;
       event.y_root = 0;
       event.state = /* (const) */ ShiftMask;   
       event.keycode = XKeysymToKeycode(/* display = */ display, 
          /* keysym = */ keysym);
       event.same_screen = /* (const) */ True;  

       XSendEvent(/* display = */ display, /* w = (const) */ InputFocus,
          /* propagate = (const) */ True, /* event_mask = (const) */ 
          KeyPressMask, /* event_send = */ (XEvent *)(&event));

       event.type = /* (const) */ KeyRelease;   
       event.time = 1000 * time(/* tloc = */ NULL);

       XSendEvent(/* display = */ display, /* w = (const) */ InputFocus,
          /* propagate = (const) */ True, /* event_mask = (const) */ 
          KeyReleaseMask, /* event_send = */ (XEvent *)(&event));
    }

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Instead of doing this on the X11 level I recommend to do it on the input device level. /dev/input/event<n> give you the input events. You can read off the keypresses there and decide if they should propagate further or be consumed. Unfortunately there's no real documentation for this, but the header file linux/include/input.h is quite self explanatory. Also the evdev maintainer will gladly answer emails.

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Not really an option at all if his code is not running as root, and you'd have to re-implement all the tricky keyboard junk the X server handles (layout, keycode mapping, etc), last, you'd have to deal with hotplug and the fact that the X server grabs the devices exclusively. –  Spudd86 Jul 22 '11 at 22:39
    
@Spudd86: The OP wants a global hook. To me global means, that it will take over all further processing. Yes this requires some dealing with hotplug, but this is not too complicated, either. The X server grabbing the device is no problem either. BTDT: a while back I coded such a "global hook" to catch my keyboard's multimedia keys but pass on the rest. –  datenwolf Jul 23 '11 at 9:39
    
Depends on what you're doing, if you want to be able to refer to keys by the symbol printed on them you're gonna have to deal with all the madness that xkb does so you can get the layouts right. (Since you'd want it to be the same as whatever the X server is doing) –  Spudd86 Aug 2 '11 at 5:39
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