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This is a general question, more looking for documentation. I have read the following two posts which have been helpful,

Dynamic Shared Library compilation with g++

C++ Dynamic Shared Library on Linux

but I am looking for a book or wiki or other forms of documentation with more of an explanation. I specifically am looking for information on C++ (not C) Dynamically Linked Library writing. I would like to learn to use dynamic modules and not just plain shared libraries.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

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Could you elaborate on what you mean by "dynamic modules vs plain shared libraries"? –  Mat Jul 3 '11 at 3:47
    
@Mat: Pretty sure that by "plain shared library" he means a statically loaded library –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Jul 3 '11 at 4:46
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@Mat: I think he means plugins loaded via dlopen(), vs shared libraries loaded at load-time. –  ninjalj Jul 3 '11 at 7:08
    
Sorry I should of been more clear. I am just starting to learn about these things and got my vocabulary mixed up. This article should clarify what I meant (faqs.org/docs/Linux-HOWTO/Program-Library-HOWTO.html). If you don't want to look at that, what I mean by plain shared libraries is static libraries. The HOW TO above says there are two types of shared libraries. I am interested in dynamic ones the use dlopen like ninjalj mentioned above. However from a C++ object oriented standpoint. –  Matthew Hoggan Jul 4 '11 at 4:47
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I think all you need is How to write Shared Libraries, by Ulrich Drepper - excellent article covering almost everything you want/need to know about writing shared libs.

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