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#include<cuda_runtime.h>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<cuda.h>
#include<stdlib.h>


__global__ void setVal(char **c){

c[(blockIdx.y * gridDim.x) + blockIdx.x] = "hello\0";

}


int main(){

char **gpu = NULL;
cudaMalloc((void**)&gpu, 6 * sizeof(char *));
int i;
/*
I cannot access second level directly
for( i =0 ; i < 6 ;i++){
    cudaMalloc((void**)&gpu[i], 10 * sizeof(char));
}*/


dim3 grid(3,2);
setVal<<<grid, 1>>>(gpu);
char *p = (char*)malloc(10 * sizeof(char));
char *x[6];

cudaMemcpy(x, gpu, 6*sizeof(char*), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
for( i =0 ; i< 6; i++){
    cudaMemcpy(p, x[i], 10*sizeof(char), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
    //put synchronize here if problem
    printf("%s\n",p);

}


getchar();
return 0;
}

Based on all the suggestions, i revised my code to make my concept correct. But, the code is still not working :(. Any help will be appreciated

share|improve this question
    
When i add a watch to grid, it says grid not found. –  Programmer Jul 3 '11 at 3:56
    
can anyone with a cuda machine run this for me and check? –  Programmer Jul 3 '11 at 4:44
    
You don't even have a question anymore. –  tkerwin Jul 3 '11 at 10:59
    
Is there an actual question here? Based on this and the the other question you asked, I would strongly recommend spending some time revising the theory of pointers in C, because all your code you have posted in the last couple of days contains elementary pointer usage and memory space separation errors . –  talonmies Jul 3 '11 at 13:01
    
@talonmies: I sat down for 2 hours today to study pointers. Above is my revised version of the code which is still not giving correct output. I will be obliged if you could tell me my mistake –  Programmer Jul 3 '11 at 22:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this -- I tested it on a GTX 285 under CUDA 3.2 -- so it's a bit more restrictive than the current version, but it works.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

__global__ void setValues(char** word)
{
    volatile char* myWord = word[blockIdx.x];

    myWord[0] = 'H';
    myWord[1] = 'o';
    myWord[2] = 'l';
    myWord[3] = 'a';
    myWord[4] = '\0';
}

int main()
{
    const size_t bufferSize = 32;
    const int nObjects = 10;

    char*  h_x[nObjects];
    char** d_x = 0;

    cudaMalloc( (void**)(&d_x), nObjects * sizeof(char*) );

    for ( int i=0; i < nObjects; i++ )
    {
        h_x[i] = NULL;
        cudaMalloc( (void**)(&h_x[i]), bufferSize * sizeof(char) );
        printf("h_x[%d] = %lx\n",i,(unsigned long)h_x[i]);
    }

    cudaMemcpy( d_x, h_x, nObjects*sizeof(char*), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    printf("Copied h_x[] to d_x[]\n");

    char msg[] = "Hello World!";
    cudaMemcpy( h_x[0], msg, 13*sizeof(char), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice );

    /*  Force Thread Synchronization  */
    cudaError err = cudaThreadSynchronize();

    /*  Check for and display Error  */
    if ( cudaSuccess != err )
    {
        fprintf( stderr, "Cuda error in file '%s' in line %i : %s.\n",
                __FILE__, __LINE__, cudaGetErrorString( err) );
    }

    setValues<<<nObjects,1>>>(d_x);

    /*  Force Thread Synchronization  */
    err = cudaThreadSynchronize();

    /*  Check for and display Error  */
    if ( cudaSuccess != err )
    {
        fprintf( stderr, "Cuda error in file '%s' in line %i : %s.\n",
                __FILE__, __LINE__, cudaGetErrorString( err) );
    }

    printf("Kernel Completed Successfully.  Woot.\n\n");

    char p[bufferSize];

    printf("d_x = %lx\n", (unsigned long)d_x );
    printf("h_x = %lx\n", (unsigned long)h_x );

    cudaMemcpy( h_x, d_x, nObjects*sizeof(char*), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);

    printf("d_x = %lx\n", (unsigned long)d_x );
    printf("h_x = %lx\n", (unsigned long)h_x );

    for ( int i=0; i < nObjects; i++ )
    {
        cudaMemcpy( &p, h_x[i], bufferSize*sizeof(char), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
        printf("%d p[] = %s\n",i,p);
    }

    /*  Force Thread Synchronization  */
    err = cudaThreadSynchronize();

    /*  Check for and display Error  */
    if ( cudaSuccess != err )
    {
        fprintf( stderr, "Cuda error in file '%s' in line %i : %s.\n",
                __FILE__, __LINE__, cudaGetErrorString( err) );
    }

    getchar();

    return 0;
}

As @Jon notes, you can't pass x (as you had declared) it to the GPU, because it's an address which lives on the CPU. In the code above, I create an array of char*'s and pass them to a char** which I also allocated on the GPU. Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
What does char ** mean? Pls give example? –  Programmer Jul 3 '11 at 6:59
    
It is a pointer to an array of pointers. –  M. Tibbits Jul 3 '11 at 7:01
    
There is an excellent page here which describes pointers to pointers toward the bottom. Note: it even uses char** in its example. –  M. Tibbits Jul 3 '11 at 7:03
    
So, is char ** y similar to char *x[6] in a way as both are pointers to array of pointers? –  Programmer Jul 3 '11 at 8:54
1  
Thanks for the answer. However, you dont need the line: cudaMemcpy( h_x, d_x, nObjectssizeof(char), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost); –  Programmer Jul 4 '11 at 2:49

The main problem with your code is that you're not allocating any device memory for the setValues call. You can't pass it a pointer to host memory (char *x[6]) and expect that to work; the CUDA kernels have to operate on CUDA memory. You create that memory, then operate on it, then copy it back:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <cuda.h>
#include <cuda_runtime.h>

__global__ void setValues(char *arr){
    arr[blockIdx.y * gridDim.x + blockIdx.x] = '4';
}

int main() {
    const int NCHARS=6;
    char *xd;

    cudaMalloc(&xd, NCHARS);
    dim3 grid(3,2);
    setValues<<<grid,1>>>(xd);

    char *p;
    p = (char*) malloc(20*sizeof(char));
    strcpy(p,"");

    cudaMemcpy(p, xd, NCHARS, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
    p[NCHARS]='\0';

    printf("<%s>\n", p);
    getchar();

    cudaFree(xd);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Note: char *xd is a pointer to a char array. I need a array of char pointers in my case because I want to initialize a string to each index of the array. Can you change your code to accomodate this? –  Programmer Jul 3 '11 at 4:39

There are several problems I'm seeing here. Here are some of the most obvious ones:

First, my guess is that the character string constant "4" is stored in host (CPU) memory, so you would have to copy it explicitly to device (global) memory. Once the string "4" is in device memory, then you can store a pointer to "4" in a device memory value, such as an element of array arr.

Second, the array x you pass to the setValues kernel is also in host memory. Remember that you need to use cudaMalloc to allocate a (global) device memory region, which an on-device kernel can then point to.

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