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I am trying to convert an RGB image to a grayscale image. RGB image is 160*120*4, while my grayscale is 160*120*1. However, it doesnt gives me wat i wan but just plain black and it takes a very long time. This is wat i wrote, please advice. Thanks

int i, j, sum;
Image = new unsigned char [ 160 * 120 * 1 ];
for( int j = 0; j < 120; j++ ) {

    for( int i = 0; i < 160; i++ ) {
    sum=0;
        sum += PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ];
        sum += PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ];
        sum += PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ];
        sum += PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ];
        *Image = sum/4;

        PaintBox2->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ] = *Image;
        Image++;
    }
}
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1  
Turbo C++ doesn't even exists anymore. I suggest you move to Visual Studio 2005/2008/2010 and get an Express edition, which is free. Then start using OpenCV (a cross-platform library for image processing) for doing serious work. –  karlphillip Jul 3 '11 at 5:46
    
I agree with what you said, more than anything. But changing the platform is not something i can make decision on. –  Chang Jul 3 '11 at 12:05
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1 Answer

There's several problem in the code that I can see immediately. The most striking comes from within the innermost for loop:

sum=0;
sum += PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ];
sum += PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ];
sum += PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ];
sum += PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ];
*Image = sum/4;

Here, you have simply added the same value to sum four times over, and then divided by four. This makes these six lines equivalent to

*Image = PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ];

Clearly, you actually wanted to average each channel. If your RGB image were implemented as a three-dimensional array, this would probably look something like:

sum = 0;
sum += PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ][ 0 ];
sum += PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ][ 1 ];
sum += PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ][ 2 ];
sum += PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ][ 3 ];
*Image = sum/4;

However, from your code example, it looks like your RGB image is actually implemented as a two-dimensional array of (un)signed integers. In that case, the following code should suffice (provided integers are four bytes on your machine):

sum = 0;
unsigned int pixel = PaintBox1->Canvas->Pixels[ i ][ j ];
for(int k = 0; k < 4; ++k)
{
    sum += pixel & 0xFF;
    pixel >>= 1;
}
*Image = sum/4;

The other major problem I see is that you do not keep a pointer to the beginning of your grayscale array. You initialize it as

Image = new unsigned char[ 160 * 120 * 1 ];

which is good. But then each time through the loop, you've written

Image++;

Rather, you should keep a pointer to the beginning of the array, and have a temporary pointer which acts as an iterator:

// before the for loops
Image = new unsigned char[ 160 * 120 * 1 ];
unsigned char * temp = Image;

// at the end of the inner for loop:
temp++;

So you only move around the temp pointer, while Image stays fixed.

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Oh I get the pointer part. But the average part i dun quite get it, becuase i have rgb value, each Pixels holds 4 values, x amt of red, x amt of blue, x amt of green, and lastly a NULL. –  Chang Jul 3 '11 at 5:11
    
You say that each pixel holds 4 values. Are they stored inside a single unsigned int or something? How exactly is your image implemented? –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Jul 3 '11 at 5:12
    
You may want to match the luminance of the source RGB image in the destination grayscale image. Use the following standard formula: Y = 0.299*R + 0.587*G + 0.114*B –  Hernán Jul 3 '11 at 5:14
    
@Ken, It is mapHead.head.biSize = sizeof( BITMAPINFOHEADER ); mapHead.head.biWidth = 160; mapHead.head.biHeight = 120; mapHead.head.biPlanes = 1; mapHead.head.biBitCount = 32; mapHead.head.biCompression = BI_RGB; mapHead.head.biSizeImage = 0; mapHead.head.biXPelsPerMeter = 1000; mapHead.head.biYPelsPerMeter = 1000; mapHead.head.biClrUsed = 0; mapHead.head.biClrImportant = 0; image = new unsigned char[ 160 * 120 * 4 ]; } so the image size is 160width 120height and 4values per pixel. @Hernan, wat does it mean by standard formula? –  Chang Jul 3 '11 at 5:22
    
@Chang stackoverflow.com/questions/687261/… –  Hernán Jul 3 '11 at 5:29
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