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I am new to java and I am just trying to get feel of this language with the following example.Can anyone tell why the following program only shows:

     calling prod
     calling cons

import java.util.concurrent.*;

public class Trial5 {
    static public void main(String[] arg){
            new Prod();
            new Cons();
    }
}

class Q {
    static Semaphore semc = new Semaphore(0);
    static Semaphore semp  = new Semaphore(1);
    static int q[];
}

class Cons implements Runnable{
    Thread t;
    Cons () {
            System.out.println("calling cons");
            Thread t = new Thread();
            t.start();
    }
    public void run () {
            System.out.println("Running semc");
            try {
                System.out.println ("Waiting for Data.Acquiring semc");
                Q.semc.acquire ();
                if(Q.q[0] != 0) {
                    System.out.println(Q.q[0]);
                    Q.q[0] = 0;
                } else {
                    wait ();
                }
                System.out.println ("Releasing semc");
                Q.semc.release ();
            }
            catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println (e.getMessage());
         }
     }
 }

 class Prod implements Runnable {
      Thread t;
      Prod () {
           System.out.println ("calling prod");
           t = new Thread ();
           t.start ();
      }
      public void run() {
           System.out.println ("running semp");
           try {
                System.out.println ("Waiting for Data.Acquiring semp");
                Q.semp.acquire ();
                if (Q.q[0] == 0) {
                     System.out.println ("setting value semp");
                     Q.q[0] = 10;
                } else {
                     Thread.sleep(100);
                }
                System.out.println ("Releasing semp");
                Q.semp.release ();
           }
           catch (Exception e) {
                System.out.println (e.getMessage());
           }    
      }
 }
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3 Answers 3

Your problem isn't with Semaphore, it's with your threads. Your run method is not executing because you're instantiating new instances of Thread which have no idea about the classes you've created and running those rather than doing anything with the classes you've created. So your run methods are never getting called.

Specifically, the lines like this:

Thread t = new Thread();
t.start();

have no reference to the classes they are contained in. They just create a new Thread object which has only the default run method and then start it.

This site has examples of how Threads get run (either through extending Thread or by implementing Runnable). You're going to have to restructure your code some to get it to work, though. Although it might work to simply change the lines to read

Thread t = new Thread(this);

that's a bad idea since you'd be passing the object as a value while its constructor is still running. A better idea would be to have your main method construct each object and then use them to start the threads running.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you point that out in code.It would be easier to understand that way.TNx –  WordsWorth Jul 3 '11 at 6:01
    
I've expanded my answer some. Essentially, you start Threads in java one of two ways: 1) create a Runnable object and then pass it to the constructor of Thread and the call start 2) extend Thread with a new object, construct that object, and then start it. You're not doing either of those things. –  Keith Irwin Jul 3 '11 at 6:06
    
Tanx!!It was really helpful. –  WordsWorth Jul 3 '11 at 6:11

Furthermore:

  1. Always use semaphores in a try-finally block. So that whatever happens you always release the semaphore, otherwise a deadlock is bound to happen.
  2. You're calling 'wait()' (which is is a method of the Runnable (inherited from Object) instance) but you can't because you don't own the lock. For more on this see Monitor
  3. Thread.sleep(100) actually throws an InterruptedException: catch it and re-interrupt the thread as the interrupted flag is cleared when InterruptedException is thrown. For more on this topic see for instance Dealing with InterruptedException
share|improve this answer

You need to do

t = new Prod();

and

t= new Cons();

see here for further reference: http://www.exampledepot.com/egs/java.lang/BasicThread.html

share|improve this answer
    
This isn't quite right because Prod and Cons only extend Runnable, not Thread, so they aren't Thread objects. Also, if he did that in place in his code, it wouldn't work since the t variables are currently inside the constructors for Prod and Cons. You're right about where the problem is, but he needs to change more than just that. –  Keith Irwin Jul 3 '11 at 6:11
    
Good catch...did not really read into this as much as I should have. –  user623879 Jul 3 '11 at 6:37

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