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In mysql I can query select * ... LIMIT 10, 30 where 10 represents the number of records to skip.

Does anyone know how I can do the same thing in delete statements where every record after the first 10 records get deleted?

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What is the key of your table? –  ring0 Jul 3 '11 at 6:47
    
it's a GUID string. –  Arman Jul 3 '11 at 6:48
    
This deleted answer should be mentioned I think: DELETE FROM TABLE WHERE ID IN (SELECT ID FROM TABLE LIMIT 10, 30). @Am commented that that does not work in "this version of MySQL". So although it isn't the answer to the question, it might be helpful for other answerers :) –  Nanne Jul 3 '11 at 6:56

2 Answers 2

Considering there is no rowId in MySQL (like in Oracle), I would suggest the following:

alter table mytable add id int unique auto_increment not null;

This will automatically number your rows in the order of a select statement without conditions or order-by.

select * from mytable;

Then, after checking the order is consistent with your needs (and maybe a dump of the table)

delete from mytable where id > 10;

Finally, you may want to remove that field

alter table mytable drop id;
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Some questions: Is it defined how adding an auto_increment will number when altering a table like this? Would it keep to the needed order, and if so when testing: is this "coincidence" or defined behaviour? Also: does mysql reset the auto_increment number after dropping the column? If not, you might want to explicitly set that, or it might keep on counting. And finally: how expencive would this become for big tables? –  Nanne Jul 3 '11 at 7:27

The following will NOT work:

DELETE 
FROM table_name 
WHERE id IN
  ( SELECT id
    FROM table_name
    ORDER BY          --- whatever
    LIMIT 10, 30
  ) 

But this will:

DELETE 
FROM table_name 
WHERE id IN
  ( SELECT id
    FROM 
      ( SELECT id
        FROM table_name
        ORDER BY          --- whatever
        LIMIT 10, 30
      ) AS tmp
  ) 

And this too:

DELETE table_name 
FROM table_name 
  JOIN
    ( SELECT id
      FROM table_name
      ORDER BY          --- whatever
      LIMIT 10, 30
    ) AS tmp
    ON tmp.id = table_name.id 
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