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I have a form where use enters multiple line of texts in a text area. Some of the lines can have html markups as well. Say one line is bold.

How should I save the text in my database? Should I store them as like this?

This is a greap post
<br/>
I love this type of findings.
<br/>
<br/>
Thanks for sharing

OR like this?

This is a greap post
&lt;br/&gt;
I love this type of findings.
&lt;br/&gt;
&lt;br/&gt;
Thanks for sharing

During editing: I must show the text as they were entered. So line break will be replaced by new line That way use sees there is a line break. Textarea won't unserstand br markup

During displaying: I must render the text so that it appears like this on the page:

This is a greap post

I love this type of findings.


Thanks for sharing

I want to know the cleanest way to store text that can have markup in them.

Thanks for help

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data storage and presentation are 2 completely separate things –  Mitch Wheat Jul 3 '11 at 6:58
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3 Answers

Since you want to output HTML, you will have to store the input in it's raw format in the database. There is only one catch though. You never should trust input, since all input is evil, especially in this case, since outputting HTML directly as it is inputted, opens the possibility of an cross-site scripting (XSS) attack.

You have basically got two options:

  1. Use a HTML sanitizer that let's you remove all tags that are not known to be safe. A good sanitizer is the one that comes with the Microsoft AntiXss toolkit.

  2. Encode the input and decode parts of the result that are known to be safe, for instance:

string[] safeList = { "<br/>", "<b>", "</b>", "<i>", "</i>" };

public static string EncodeInputWithSafeList(string unsafeInput)
{
    // First: encode the complete input.
    string safeInput = Encoder.HtmlEncode(unsafeInput);

    // Next: decode each tag that is known to be safe.
    foreach (string safeTag in safeList)
    {
        string encodedTag = Encoder.HtmlEncode(safeTag, false);
        safeInput = safeInput.Replace(encodedTag, safeTag);
    }

    return safeInput;
}

Note: The example uses the Encoder class from the Microsoft AntiXss toolkit.

Now the question becomes, at what point should we clean it up. Normally you should encode the output just before you send it to the client and not store it encoded in the database, since it depends on the output type (HTML, PDF, JSON) how data should be encoded. This is amplified by the fact that in case there is a bug in the encoder, there is no way to fix it, since the data is already encoded.

In this case it is a bit more tricky though, since the input is HTML and not just text. I would say that sanitizing is something you still would want to do before hand, because this way you prevent bad input from entering your database. The EncodeInputWithSafeList method is a bit tricky, because it is both a sanitizer and an encoder. When we run it before it goes into the database, it prevents the output from changing when we change the safe list. This can be both a good thing and a bad thing, but I would say that when you add new tags to the safe list, you wouldn't want old data to suddenly change. So in this case I would go with input encoding, instead of output encoding.

When you go with input encoding, name the database column in such way that it is clear that we're dealing with sanitized, encoded data.

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Try htmlentities($str, ENT_QUOTES); before you save the data, and html_entity_decode($str) after you fetch it from your db, before you render it to the browser.

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htmlentities() and html_entity_decode() are from plugin or jquery? –  user762196 Jul 3 '11 at 7:04
    
Ah sorry didn't see the ASP.net tag. htmlentites, etc is PHP. For ASP.net you'll want to use Server.HtmlEncode("<your string>"); and Server.HtmlDecode("&lt;your string&gt;"); –  AlienWebguy Jul 3 '11 at 7:07
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saving it to your database like this:

<p>This is a greap post
<br/>
I love this type of findings.
<br/>
<br/>
Thanks for sharing</p>

would work..

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That is extremely dangerous. I love this type of <script type="text/javascript........> XSS Fail. –  AlienWebguy Jul 3 '11 at 7:02
    
extremely dangerous from security or code complexity? –  user762196 Jul 3 '11 at 7:05
    
@Alien:OP is asking whether he should save it to database using "<" ">" or "&lt" and "&gt" and the way i see it, it doesnt really matter in terms of performance..he didnt mention anything about security concern, he mentioned "efficiency" –  Benny Tjia Jul 3 '11 at 7:09
    
Whatever is done has to be secured. Otherwise, it might end up as useless –  user762196 Jul 3 '11 at 7:11
    
well, then if you really want safety you probably should rephrase your question. in that case I would not recommend using HTML tags at all, since the safest way would be stripping all HTML tags from the user-entered text. –  Benny Tjia Jul 3 '11 at 7:15
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