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I know there are a lot of question already on this subject, but I needed more specific information. So here goes:

  1. Ideally what should be the maximum length of characters upon which a full text search can be performed using minimal resources (CPU, memory)?
  2. When should I decide between using the LIKE %$str% and full-text search?
  3. Is it important to have both versions LIKE %$str% and full-text search implemented and use the optimal one dynamically?
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. As far as I know it depends on the number of words, not characters. The fewer, the faster mysql will be. But don't let that get in your way.
  2. Never use LIKE if you can use a full-text search. Except maybe for queries that you would manually run once in a while and you don't want to slow down the INSERTs on that table. You know the speed of select vs speed of insert tradeoff in indexes, right?
  3. Always use FT (full-text) search in queries that you don't run manually. LIKE is slow and becomes really slower when the number of rows increases. This is because the mysql engine has to look into EVERY row to answer your query. And FT keeps an index and knows exactly where to look.
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Thanks a lot. :-) Expanding a little on the 3rd question, I will still have to use the LIKE when I'm searching for the keywords that are excluded from the MySQL FT search right? Also, what about people searching for a string less than 3 characters? –  Sterex Jul 4 '11 at 4:02
    
You can still use the FT search for that. If you want to search for every word you can change or disable the excluded words. Also there is an option to index words with less than 3 characters. These are all configurable. Take a look here: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/fulltext-fine-tuning.html ft_min_word_len and ft_stopword_file should help you with that. –  stormbreaker Jul 4 '11 at 5:02
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Thanks a lot @storm! :-) Will get to it after work. :-) –  Sterex Jul 4 '11 at 5:50

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