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1) OnCreate is public method of instantiated object from ClsLast class. But I wanted to restrict OnCreate method as protected.

interface InterFace {
    void OnCreate();
}

class ClsFirst implements InterFace {
    @Override
    public void OnCreate() { }

}

class ClsLast extends ClsFirst{ }

class Test {
    static void main(){
        ClsLast objClsAct = new ClsLast();
        objClsAct.OnCreate();
    }
}

2) If I set OnCreate method as protected in InterFace

interface InterFace {
    protected void OnCreate();
}   

I'm getting error like this: Illegal modifier for the interface method OnCreate; only public & abstract are permitted

3) If I set protected the method inside the ClsFirst class which implements InterFace like this:

interface InterFace {
    void OnCreate();
}   

class ClsFirst implements InterFace {
    @Override
    protected void OnCreate() { }

}

I'm getting this error: Cannot reduce the visibility of the inherited method from InterFace

4) When I change the ClsFirst as abstract class and implements InterFace

interface InterFace {
    void OnCreate();
}   

abstract class ClsFirst implements InterFace {

}

I haven't to implement OnCreate method inside the ClsFirst class but ClsLast why?

Summary

  1. How can I set Interface methods can only be used in derived classes?
  2. Why can't I set methods with protected access inside Interface?
  3. Why can't I set the accessor type of Class different than public after I implement the InterFace?
  4. abstract classes that even if they implements an interface don't have to add unimplemented methods itself until one class derives abstracted classes. Why?

Thank you so much for your kind answers from now.

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Can you explain in which situation you think implementing an interface but restricting access only to derived classes would make sense? If only derived classes can see a method, why would you need an interface? –  dtb Jul 3 '11 at 10:31
    
I want to create interfaces and put some rules from the begining of creating the class structure. But while trying to do this, I faced other questions.And I thought, with your answers there may be good info about OOP for me and everybody.But my first desire is putting rules and creating good class structure using interface and abstract classes. –  uzay95 Jul 3 '11 at 10:38
    
One point of OOP is that the developer is free to design the non-public parts of a class as he sees fit. You can put rules only on the public parts of a class structure. –  dtb Jul 3 '11 at 10:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An interfaceis per definition a public contract. By implementing an interface you promise to provide a set of methods (and properties in other languages).

An interface has nothing in common with abstract classes because you can implement as many interfaces as you want on a single class and you implement instead of derive from it.

An abstract class is a base class, its like a partially functionally base which is used to share implementation details between different classes and provides a contract, too. However it's more an internal contract for all derived classes. Most times abstract classes are used to force all derived classes into a common pattern instead of sharing a public contract.

An abstract class can force a derived class to implement a method (or provide a suitable default implementation using the virtual keyword) and take use of this method (this is called Template Pattern).

If you implement an interface on an abstract class you don't have to provide all interface methods because the abstract class can not be instantiated. However if you don't implement all interface methods the first non abstract class in your hierarchy has to provide the missing methods.

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Interface methods are always public. You can not reduce the scope of these methods. Use a protected abstract method instead in an abstract class.

share|improve this answer
  1. You cannot do it. You can set methods both as virtual or abstract if you have an middle class which implements only a part of defined in interface contract.

  2. You also cannot do it and the reason is simple, interface defines a contract, a set of operations which implementation is requested to have. You can implement the interface explicitly in your abstract class or restrict whole interface to be "internal", at least in c# in case if you would like to keep it 'in-house'.

  3. You cannot do it because you promised to implement an interface.

  4. Because another thing which you indirectly pointed once you mark class as an abstract is that you cannot instantiate it. Therefore you pass the requirement of implementing interface to the first class which you can create the instance of (I mean the chain of inheritance).

ad1. (c# example1)

interface IDummyInterface
{
    void OnCreate();
    void Process();
    void OnFinish();
}

abstract class DummyAbstract : IDummyInterface
{
    public virtual void OnCreate()
    {
    }

    public abstract void Process();

    public void OnFinish()
    {
        OnFinishInternal();
    }

    protected abstract void OnFinishInternal();
}

class DummyImplementor : DummyAbstract
{
    public override void OnCreate()
    {
        // some other action here
        base.OnCreate();
    }

    public override void Process()
    {
    }

    protected override void OnFinishInternal()
    {
    }
}
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Thank you for your 4 answers.Now I'm trying to understand and test them one by one. I couldn't set protected method inside middle class. Would you give an example to your 1st answer. –  uzay95 Jul 3 '11 at 11:03

Actually you can hide the method, until the your concrete class is casted to an "Interface" instance by implementing the Interface explicitly:

abstract class ClsFirst : Interface
{
     void Interface.OnCreate()
     {
          this.OnCreate();
     }

     protected abstract void OnCreate();
}

ClsFirst last = new ClsLast();
last.OnCreate(); // Compiler Error, since OnCreate() is protected
Interface lastAsInterface = last;
lastAsInterface.OnCreate(); // Works, and calls the abstract OnCreate() method. 
share|improve this answer
    
In java: interface InterFace { void OnCreate(); } abstract class ClsFirst implements InterFace { protected abstract void OnCreate(); } is generating this error:Cannot reduce the visibility of the inherited method from InterFace and I can't implement void InterFace.OnCreate() method inside abstract class. –  uzay95 Jul 3 '11 at 10:49
    
But in C# your response is working without giving any error. –  uzay95 Jul 3 '11 at 10:52
    
Sorry, I was thrown of by tag "C#". It seems that Java does support explicit interfaces, but implementing them inside an abstract class, is a problem. –  J. Tihon Jul 3 '11 at 10:53

1) Why would you want to implement a protected interface to begin with? It does not add any value. You already have a way to make sure all derived classes comply with a given contract:

 protected abstract void OnCreate();

2) Interfaces define a public contract. By public I mean that it has the same accesibility as the interface itselft. That is why accesibility modifiers are not permitted when defining interface members.

3) You can not decrease accesibility of any virtual member or interface members as you would be breaking the interface's contract. In your example ((IOnCreate)ClsFirst).OnCreate() would not be possible as OnCreate() is not accesible, which would mean that ClsFirst does not implement IOnCreate interface.

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