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Just started re-learning Haskell (did it at uni but forgot most of it) and thought I would implement a Fibonacci function to start of with. However, I keep getting a stackoverflow, even for very small n.

Can anyone spot any problems with my function?

fib :: Integer -> Integer
fib 0 = 0
fib 1 = 1
fib n = fib (n-1) + fib (n+1)
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1  
Hint - you might want to check this free book: book.realworldhaskell.org – Karoly Horvath Jul 3 '11 at 11:10
2  
Note that Fibonacci numbers are usually written as fibs = 0 : 1 : zipWith (+) fibs (tail fibs) in Haskell. – Landei Jul 3 '11 at 12:50
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have an error in your fibonacci formula:

fib :: Integer -> Integer
fib 0 = 0
fib 1 = 1
fib n = fib (n-1) + fib (n-2)

Note the very last term where there is n-2 instead of n+1.

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Thanks, obvious mistake! – Jim Jeffries Jul 3 '11 at 11:03

It's a very bad implementation, you should use tail recursion, start from 0 or 1 going upwards and passing the previous two fibonacci numbers. Also there is a bug, fib n depends on fib n+1.

fib :: Integer -> Integer
fib 0 = 0
fib n = iter 0 1 n
  where iter :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer -> Integer
        iter f1 f2 0 = f2
        iter f1 f2 n = iter f2 (f1+f2) (n-1)
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5  
As a learning exercise I don't see a problem with doing it this way. Though I agree it's not the most optimal implementation – zebrabox Jul 3 '11 at 10:47
1  
Mmm I'm not so sure about this, tail recursion is fundamental to every functional programming language. That code is expontential, try a very simple fib 50. Ok, 'very bad' might been a bit rude, sorry :) – Karoly Horvath Jul 3 '11 at 10:55
1  
I agree but let the OP at least get simple recursion and pattern matching sorted first – zebrabox Jul 3 '11 at 10:57
2  
actually you need strictness annotations or the tail recursion won't work (or the optimizer might add it for you) – alternative Jul 3 '11 at 12:24
2  
@yi_H While tail recursion is important, it's not as important in Haskell as in strict functional languages. For instance, map is not tail recursive, but it works exactly as it should for long lists anyway. In fact, it works as it should because it is not tail recursive. – augustss Jul 3 '11 at 18:52

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