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I want to write a script in bash, that produces a list of a directory into a file. It is necessary to mark every line as file or directory.

This is my unfinished attempt:

#!/bin/bash
if [ $# -eq 1 ]
then
 if [ -d $1 ]
 then
  touch liste.txt
  ls -l $1 | grep '^-' >> liste.txt
  ls -l $1 | grep '^d' >> liste.txt
 fi
fi

now I don t know how to print in every line "file" or "directory". Maybe there is a more elegant way to solve this.

Greetings, Haniball

Thanks Pavium,

here the finished script:

#!/bin/bash
if [ $# -eq 1 ]
then
 if [ -d $1 ]
 then
  rm liste.txt
  touch liste.txt
  ls -l $1 | grep '^-' | sed -e "s/^-/File /g" >> liste.txt
  ls -l $1 | grep '^d' | sed -e "s/^d/Directory /g" >> liste.txt
 fi
 more liste.txt
fi

I am sure that there a more elegant solution. Maybe grep can be thrown out, but I had to restrict the output to only lines that match the pattern.

Greetings, Haniball

share|improve this question
    
Note that the second > liste.txt will overwrite the first. I suggest you use >> to append to the file. –  pavium Jul 3 '11 at 12:47
    
thanks pavium for the hint –  Haniball Jul 3 '11 at 12:48
    
Ok, almost what I meant. Now I suggest you use sed to replace '^-' with 'file ' and replace '^d' with 'directory', or something like that. –  pavium Jul 3 '11 at 12:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use sed as pavium already said.

ls -l $1 | grep '^-' | sed 's/^/file: /' >> liste.txt
ls -l $1 | grep '^d' | sed 's/^/directory: /' >> liste.txt

Or in one command:

ls -l $1 | sed -n -e '/^-/{s/^/file: /p;d;}' -e '/^d/{s/^/directory: /p;d;}' > liste.txt

Or you can do something different:

for f in $1/* ; do 
  if [ -d "$f" ]; then
    echo "directory: $f" >> liste1.txt
  else
    echo "file: $f" >> liste1.txt
  fi
done
share|improve this answer
(
    find . -maxdepth 1 -mindepth 1 -type f -printf 'file %f\n' | sort
    find . -maxdepth 1 -mindepth 1 -type d -printf 'dir %f\n' | sort
) > liste.txt

But perhaps simple:

ls -l --group-directories-first

will be enough?

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stat --printf="%F\t%n\n" * > file.listing
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