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Interface methods in C# can be implemented explicitly, so that their implementation is invoked when an instance is explicitly cast to the interface type. Why is this not also supported on virtual methods of classes?

Although working around the 'multiple inheritance' issue is unique to interfaces, it seems that for every other reason that explicitly implemented members would be useful for interfaces, they would also be useful for virtual methods. A cleaner return-type covariance model springs to mind.

Edit: By request, an example:

public class Foo {
    ...
}

public class Bar : Foo {
   ...
}

class Base {
   abstract Foo A ();
}

class Dervied {
  private Bar _b;

  Bar A () {
    return _b;
  }

  Foo Base.A () {
    return _b;
  }
}

I am aware of using helper methods to simulate this, but the net effect seems to have any of the bad characteristics that explicit implementation would have, but with a dirtier API. The crux of my question is not how to do return type covariance, but why a similar mechanism for interfaces is not supported for virtual methods.

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1  
Could you explain how you envision this working? If Derived extended Base, you're looking for a virtual method on Base only being called on implementations of Derived cast to Bar? I don't see the utility in this form of information hiding. An example would help. –  user7116 Jul 3 '11 at 16:12
1  
Explicit interface implementation is a bandaid. You have to use it to resolve the ambiguity that's introduced by being able to inherit multiple interfaces that may have members with the same signature. Which is the standard problem of multiple inheritance, minus the problem of having to select between multiple inherited implementations. A problem that doesn't exist in C# because interfaces cannot define an implementation. Thus no need for explicit method overriding, there's only one base implementation to choose from. –  Hans Passant Jul 3 '11 at 16:24
    
Your example uses abstract method, not a virtual one. Could you be more precise in your question? –  Jakub Konecki Jul 3 '11 at 16:41
    
Abstract methods are virtual implicitly and closer to a member defined in an interface, which is my comparison. My question is intended to cover both cases, however. –  Justin Aquadro Jul 3 '11 at 16:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What benefit would that have, besides from allowing something like this?

class Base
{
    virtual void M() { }
}

class Derived : Base
{
    override void M() { }

    override void Base.M() { }
}

This effectively bakes a violation of the Liskov Substitution Principle into the C# language - if I have a variable of type Base, calling M() on it can do entirely different things depending on whether the run-time type is Base or Derived.

Explicit interface implementation is different. Say you have this:

interface IFoo
{
    void DoStuff();   
}

interface IBar
{
    void DoStuff();
}

class C : IFoo, IBar
{
    void IFoo.DoStuff() { }

    void IBar.DoStuff() { }
}

This preserves the LSP - if I have an IFoo variable that happens to be of run-time type C, calling DoStuff() on it will get the IFoo implementation of it. Likewise with IBar.

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One common pattern is return type covariance as the OP mentioned. You add a new method that's equivalent to the virtual function except it returns a more specific type. –  CodesInChaos Jul 3 '11 at 16:10
    
Explicit implementation can be used to support return-type covariance without muddying up an API with hidden virtual helper methods (which destroys the primary interface in the same way that explicit implementation would, by making the primary base and override unrelated). Interestingly, return type covariance is one of the requirements your link mentions, yet is not natively supported. –  Justin Aquadro Jul 3 '11 at 16:11
1  
Suppose I have an abstract base class ReadableFoo, with an abstract read-only property Bar. I would like to have a class MutableFoo, derived from ReadableFoo, with a read-write property Bar. Is there any way to create such a class without having to add an extra layer of inheritance whose purpose is to override the read-only property "Bar"? For that matter, would there be any way to construct a project which exposed ReadableFoo and MutableFoo, described as above, without exposing any other classes? Note that ReadableFoo and MutableFoo fully obey the LSP. –  supercat Jul 6 '11 at 20:03
    
@supercat: Having MutableFoo inherit from ReadableFoo seems weird to me. It feels like a misuse of inheritance (but you're absolutely correct that it doesn't break the LSP). I think what I'd do instead is have ReadOnlyFoo hold a private readonly reference to the MutableFoo, and delegate all the property accesses to that instance. Yes, you have to update in 2 places whenever you add/remove/change a property, but you'd have that same problem using inheritance as well. I would also look at why there needs to be a ReadOnlyFoo and a MutableFoo - that seems like a code smell. –  Zack Elan Jul 8 '11 at 2:11
    
@Zack Elan: The reason for having both ReadableFoo (not ReadOnlyFoo!) and ImmutableFoo is that some routines will want to accept a Foo which they can read from now, but won't care about whether it may change later. Others may want a Foo that they know will never change. One could have a concrete implementation of read-only properties within a ReadableFoo, but that presupposes that all derived classes will want to store their information in the same backing fields--an assumption that may hold true for some classes, but not all. As a simple example... –  supercat Jul 8 '11 at 13:32

Some people recommend not having public virtual methods in the first place. But instead create one public non virtual method representing the consumer interface, and one protected virtual method representing the implementer interface.

I would not call separating the contracts for caller and implementer "muddying the design". In many cases it's cleaner IMO, but I'm usually too lazy to actually do it that way.

This design works much better with return type covariance and method hiding.

An additional benefit of this is that the public wrapper can add additional checking code and supports different contracts for the caller and implementer.

An example of how I'd emulate return type covariance:

public class Base
{
    protected virtual Base FooOverride(int i){return new Base();};//FooOverride does not need to duplicate the argument checking

    public Base Foo(int i)
    {
        if(i<0)
          throw new ArgumentException("i<0");
        return FooOverride(i);
    }
}

public class Derived:Base
{
    protected override Base FooOverride(int i){return new Derived();};
    public new Derived Foo(int i)
    {
        return (Derived)base.Foo();
    }
}
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