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I'm trying to understand how global variables and functions work in C. My program compiles and works fine with gcc, but does not compile with g++. I have the following files:

globals.h:

int i;
void fun();

globals.c:

#include "stdlib.h"
#include "stdio.h"

void fun()
{
  printf("global function\n");
}

main.c:

#include "stdlib.h"
#include "stdio.h"
#include "globals.h"

void myfun();

int main()
{

  i=1;

  myfun();

  return 0;
}

And finally, myfun.c:

#include "stdlib.h"
#include "stdio.h"
#include "globals.h"

void myfun()
{
  fun();
}

I get the following error when compiling with g++:

/tmp/ccoZxBg9.o:(.bss+0x0): multiple definition of `i'
/tmp/ccz8cPTA.o:(.bss+0x0): first defined here
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

Any ideas why? I would prefer to compile with g++.

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2  
C and C++ are not the same language. Trying to compile C with g++ is an exercise in masochism. If you want to write C++, tag your question C++; otherwise use the right compiler for the language you're writing. –  R.. Jul 3 '11 at 16:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

EVery file you include globals.h from will define "int i".

Instead put "extern int i;" into the header file and then put the actual definition of "int i = 1;" in globals.c.

Putting header guards around globals.h would be sensible too.

Edit: In answer to your question its because a #include works kind of like a cut and paste. It pastes the contents of the included file into the c file that you are calling include from. As you include "globals.h" from main.c and myfun.c you define int i = 1 in both files. This value, being a global, gets put into the table of linkable values. If you have the same variable name twice then the linked won't be able to tell which one it needs and you get the error you are seeing. Instead by adding extern on the front in the header file you are telling each file that "int i" is defined somewhere else. Obviously you need to define it somewhere else (and ONLY in one place) so defining it in globals.c makes perfect sense.

Hope that helps :)

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This worked. Would you mind explaining why I had to put int i in globals.c? –  Amit Jul 3 '11 at 16:29
1  
@Amit: Edited :) –  Goz Jul 3 '11 at 16:33
    
Perfect, exactly what I was looking for. Thanks a lot :) –  Amit Jul 3 '11 at 16:35
    
The reason is that the C preprocessor executes before the C front-end sees your code. The preprocessor is really just performing text substitution, so instantiating a variable in a .h file that is #included twice is no different to the compiler that if you manual created two variables of the same name in two C files. –  srking Jul 3 '11 at 16:36
    
@Amit: Note that the same applies to functions, it's just that void fun(); is just a declaration whereas int i; (without the extern) is a (tentative) definition. –  caf Jul 4 '11 at 8:08

I would add an include guard in your globals file

#ifndef GLOBALS_H
#define GLOBALS_H

int i;
void fun();

#endif

Edit: Change your globals to be like this (using extern as the other answer describes)

globals.h

extern  int i;
extern  void fun();

globals.c

#include "stdlib.h"
#include "stdio.h"
int i;
void fun()
{
  printf("global function\n");
}

I compiled it with

g++ globals.c main.c myfun.c

and it ran ok

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1  
He'll still get a multiple definition because he includes globals.h from 2 seperate c files ... –  Goz Jul 3 '11 at 16:26
    
Added this, but the same error remains –  Amit Jul 3 '11 at 16:27

Several things wrong here; several other things highly recommended:

globals.h:


#ifndef GLOBALS_H
#define GLOBALS_H

extern int my_global;

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif 
void fun();
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif 

#endif
/* GLOBALS_H */

globals.c:


#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "globals.h"

int my_global;

void fun()
{
  printf("global function: %d\n", my_global);
}

main.c:


#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "globals.h"

void myfun();

int main()
{

  my_global=1;

  myfun();

  return 0;
}

void myfun()
{
  fun();
}
  1. You should declare "extern int myvar" in your header, and actually allocate "int myvar" in one and only one .c file.

  2. You should include "globals.h" in every file that uses "myvar" - including the file where it's allocated.

  3. Especially if you're planning on mixing C and C++ modules, you should use 'extern "C"' to distinguish non-C++ functions.

  4. System headers should be "#include <some_header.h>"; your own headers should use quotes (#include "myheader.h") instead.

  5. Short variable names like "i" might be OK for a strictly local variable (like a loop index), but you should always use longer, descriptive names whenever you can't avoid using a global variable.

  6. I added a "printf" for my_global.

'Hope that helps!

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Thanks for the elaborate description, I really appreciate it. +1. I wasn't aware of the <header.h> rule on system headers, thanks! –  Amit Jul 5 '11 at 12:27

I had this problem when porting some old C code to C++. The problem was it was a project that was connected to a database, and i wanted to port the database to c++ but not the rest. The database pulled in some C dependencies that couldn't be ported, so i needed the C code that overlapped both the database and the other project to compile in g++ as well as gcc...

The solution to this problem is to define all variables as extern in the .h file. then when you compile in either gcc or g++ it will report symbols missing in the .c files. So edit the .c files in the error messages and insert the declaration into all the .c files that need the variables. Note: you may have to declare it in multiple .c files, which is what threw me and why I was stuck on this problem for ages.

Anyway this solved my problem and the code compiles cleanly under both gcc and g++ now.

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