Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm very new to Microsoft .Net framework
My question is which is easier and faster to learn Winforms or WPF?
Thanks.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by mydogisbox, rene, Jeroen, dystroy, iMat Oct 5 '12 at 18:49

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

16  
Isn't that a bit of an odd measure? Would you choose to become a factory worker because it's easier and faster to learn? –  H.B. Jul 3 '11 at 19:48

9 Answers 9

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Easier and faster? Almost certainly winforms.

WPF is tricker to quantify - it is more complex yet more powerful, but to be honest I've lost track of it's future... Is it killed? Who knows... Xaml certainly has life in mobile (WP7), though.

IMO though, your time is better spent learning web UI - some jQuery or HTML5.

share|improve this answer
6  
@Filip it is of course subjective, but xaml is IMO much more complex - heck, the editor (without blend) is barely usable, so you'd end up writing xaml mostly by hand. The event/property model by itself would take an age to describe properly. –  Marc Gravell Jul 3 '11 at 18:48
3  
On the edges the event model can "look" like it does in WinForms, since for instance, you can just add a click handler ( by double clicking in the editor ) and you are immediately moved to the code-file and the event handler. It's just as easy as in WinForms IMO. But yes, you are right, it's rather subjective. If you compare XAML to the Designer generated code, I'd choose XAML over anything! –  Filip Ekberg Jul 3 '11 at 18:52
1  
@Marc Gravell: I think it's a false assumption on the part of the developer to think that any designer is actually usable, but that might just be me... (I concurr that it's very complex and it may take quite some time to learn it but the documentation is good and extensive) –  H.B. Jul 3 '11 at 19:17
2  
Filip why don't you write your take on this subject. –  Ata Jul 3 '11 at 19:20
2  
@Marc Gravell: Even if the WPF is indead dead XAML will live on in "Jupiter" and not just on the phone. And why you suggest someone trying to decide between two rich client platforms to learn HTML5 is beyond me. –  Oliver Weichhold Jul 3 '11 at 20:32

WinForms is massively easier to learn (as there is very little to learn). It will be very easy to develop RAD applications. On the other hand, WPF will require a lot more effort while your app will be more maintainable (with the help of MVVM paradigm).

share|improve this answer
3  
Would be nice with some examples that shows why it's easier to learn WinForms. –  Filip Ekberg Jul 3 '11 at 18:42
    
Very subjective. I think WPF is easier to learn once you think that way. WinForms is way harder now for me. –  Telavian Aug 16 '13 at 17:58

Windows forms, would be easier to learn.

View this link for a small writeup on WPF vs Winforms.

share|improve this answer
    
And why is that? –  Filip Ekberg Jul 3 '11 at 18:41
    
@Filip Ekbery, why? Well you don't have to worry about getting to know xaml, the IDE up until reciently havn't been great and you needed to use tools like Blend, for easy drag and drop functionality. –  Jethro Jul 3 '11 at 18:47
    
You don't need to use Blend if you don't want to. In VS2010 SP1 it's much better XAML support. I've created countless of applications in XAML and I think the editor is pretty OK. –  Filip Ekberg Jul 3 '11 at 18:50
    
Yes it's a lot better then what it was, but still not as easy as winforms. Don't get me wrong I prefer WPF and the benifits of TDD, and the "eye candy" design you get, but for beginners I would have to say that winforms is easier to learn. Do you disagree? –  Jethro Jul 3 '11 at 18:55
1  
why would WinForms be easier if you come from a Java background? –  Filip Ekberg Jul 4 '11 at 11:49

While winforms is easier to learn as said by others, WPF is the preferred front end framework for .Net enterprise application these days. If you have winform skills you get to maintain apps, WPF skills will get you into new product development.

share|improve this answer
1  
That's not always true, WinForms has a Huge control supply, there are so many third party controls that people have bought over the years. I think it's going to take some more years before people stop doing WinForms applications in new projects. –  Filip Ekberg Jul 3 '11 at 18:48

Windows Forms is certainly more of a mature technology than WPF, I would say. There is an ample amount of documentation. I think that the WinForms vs. WPF thing is really absurd, because I think they each have their own use.

Windows Forms is good, and you can make very appealing UI with it. enter image description here

But I also think that WinForms is very good for developing Windows Look and Feel Applications where with WPF, you are looking for a more multimedia/rich experience.

I've developed with WinForms for years now and have yet to adopt WPF, because I still do not have a need for WPF. I can acheive everything I want with WinForms. As a matter of fact I've developed an entire framework based for WinForms to provide a rich, Windows Look and Feel experience, to able to acheive the above shown results with ease.

However, if I am in the realm of needing to creating a rich multimedia experience, I would switch over to WPF. But I'm in the realm of developing functional applications like tooks, issue tracking software, framework, etc.

As a matter of fact, here is another example of what I have done with WinForms. I feel like I can really push WinForms to the limit, and have the ability to go a step further. I like the development in it.

I think when people try to comapre WinForms to WPF in terms of design, I'm not sure they really get just what good design is. Its more then fancy buttons and animations, and pretty ribbon controls.

I'm not here to dog on either WinForms or WPF though. I think both are great technologies, but I definitely think WPF is more geared towards a rich multimedia style experience.

Furthermore, I don't think either one is easier to learn. WPF you dive into a different event style model with XAML, WinForms you dive into doing more of everything yourself. I think of WinForms vs. WPF in a C++/C# perspective, but in the UI sense. WPF seems like a higher level design style with more abstraction, which makes it much easier to design appealing UI. Rather WinForms, you literally have to make your design well by programming it all.

In conclusion (I jumped all over the place), I would try each out and some sample projects, and pick what you like the best, and what meets your specific needs. I don't believe either that just because you have WinForms skills you will be "maintaining code". There are still TONS of things being developed in WinForms today.

share|improve this answer
1  
"WinForms is very good for developing Windows Look and Feel Applications where with WPF, you are looking for a more multimedia/rich experience." I would disagree with that, just because you style the hell out everything in WPF and make it look like a spaceship you don't need to do that and you should not either. The same goes for multimedia, while there is more native support for it you don't have to use that either. If anything i would claim WPF to be strong on all kinds of data visualisation. –  H.B. Jul 3 '11 at 19:46
1  
"WinForms is very good for developing Windows Look and Feel Applications where with WPF, you are looking for a more multimedia/rich experience." i would agree with that. It is not easy to coax a WPF application to follow the UX guidelines (WPF has never even heard of a dialog unit!) –  Ian Boyd Jul 3 '11 at 19:54
3  
The screenshot you gave as an example of a good looking Windows Forms application, Visual Studio 2010, uses WPF for a substantial portion of its user interface: WPF in Visual Studio 2010. –  Rick Sladkey Jul 3 '11 at 21:58
1  
What you see is my issue tracking software I am writing, being debugged by Visual Studio 2010. It is themed to look like VS and is written only in WinForms. Note the window title "FaultTrack Professional" –  David Anderson - DCOM Jul 3 '11 at 22:07
2  
Pertinent remarks. In all the threads I've read on WPF-Winforms, the main messages I take away are 'eye-candy', 'rich data-binding', 'templates' and so on. Fine, but they are all geeks' answers. LOB users couldn't care less about technical issues; they want a solution to their business problem at minimal cost. Winforms provides them with what they want, quickly. WPF certainly has lots of bells and whistles, but we often forget that our salaries are paid by precisely those users for whom fancy widgets are nothing but an annoying distraction and rich data-binding is probably a SM practice. –  smirkingman Nov 13 '12 at 20:29

Winforms is basically easier to learn, in particular if you are coming from VB6

WPF is much more powerful in many ways but it has many new concepts (e.g. DataTemplate) that may require a lot of efforts, in particular for beginners.

When you learn WPF, you usually learn also the MVVM pattern. This is good but at least for me was not easy at the beginning.

In conclusion, WPF has more new concepts than Winform. You have to learn new things and change your way of thinking. This takes time but I think it's worth it because you can use such concepts for other purposes. For examples what I learned with WPF was useful for Android programming.

share|improve this answer

Neither and Both, easy is very subjective and depends on your background. First of all, I want to show an example of an application with the following in both WPF and WinForms:

  • A textbox for input
  • A button to do some "Processing" of the input
  • A label that will display a result

WinForms

The window can look something like this:

enter image description here

The code for this is quite trivial and easy even for a beginner:

private Button _myButton;
private Label _resultLabel;
private TextBox _inputTextBox;
public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    _myButton = new Button
    {
        Text = @"Process data",
        Top = 100
    };

    _inputTextBox = new TextBox();

    _resultLabel = new Label
    {
        Text = "",
        Top = 200
    };

    Controls.Add(_myButton);
    Controls.Add(_inputTextBox);
    Controls.Add(_resultLabel);

    _myButton.Click += Process_Click;    
}

void Process_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    _resultLabel.Text = string.Format("Your data is: {0}", _inputTextBox.Text);
}

So far, we haven't touched anything in the designer.

WPF

If we copy and paste the exact same code into a new WPF-application, there are just a handfull of things that we have to change some of them being:

  • How we add the controls to the interface
  • How we change text in a label
  • How we position it from the top ( margin )

However, these are just things that is Different between the two, it's neither more difficult nor more easy in one or the other. So this is what the window looks like in WPF:

enter image description here

And the code is Almost identical:

private Button _myButton;
private Label _resultLabel;
private TextBox _inputTextBox;
public MainWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    _myButton = new Button
    {
        Content = @"Process data",
        Margin = new Thickness(0, 100, 0, 0)
    };
    _myButton.Click += Process_Click;

    _inputTextBox = new TextBox();
    _resultLabel = new Label
    {
        Content = "",
        Margin = new Thickness(0, 100, 0, 0)
    };
    var panel = new StackPanel();
    panel.Children.Add(_inputTextBox);
    panel.Children.Add(_myButton);
    panel.Children.Add(_resultLabel);   
    Content = panel;
}

void Process_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    _resultLabel.Content = 
                 string.Format("Your data is: {0}", _inputTextBox.Text);
}

So far both WPF and WinForms seem to be equivilient hard / easy to learn. But this is just the code-behind approach, when we come to the designer, there's a huge difference.

WinForms

When you develop WinForms applications you drag and drop controls onto your surface and use a property window to change the properties of your window. This looks something like this:

enter image description here

So you can drag-n-drop your controls, you can change the properties of each control and snap them to where you want them, easy enough right?

WPF

So what about WPF? Is it much harder to do the same thing there? I think not:

enter image description here

The main difference here is that you have an extra "window" at the bottom that. This window is an XML ( XAML ) view of your design. This is where WinForms and WPF take apart from each other. But just as you can avoid writing Design Code in WinForms, you can Avoid doing it in WPF as well, as a newbie that is.

As for newbies, I don't think it's harder nor easier to learn the one or the other, when we get a bit deeper into the technology that is choosen, sure, it gets more complex. But the way there is just as easy or hard no matter which of the two you choose.

So when do you choose the one or the other?

You choose WinForms because:

  • It's been around for a long time and you have a Large control supply that you can use.
  • There are a lot of good resources on WinForms to learn from and to get new controls from.

You choose WPF because:

  • You can make richer UI, nowdays it's all about the user experience.
  • You want to have full control of your controls design.
  • You want rich, data-driven applications.
  • You want hardware accelerated UI.

How about data-binding, Design Patters and all that?

You don't need to know anything about Design Patterns nor how everything works to make a usable application, especially not as a newbie. As time goes by, you will have to learn more about the technology that you choose. People tend to say that you need to know MVVM to use WPF, that is not true. As it is not true that you need to know the MVP pattern to create WinForms applications.

Both of the technologies can handle rich-data-driven controls, you have grid views and such in both of them. WinForms has some pretty nice "drag-n-drop"-features for data manipulation and listing and WPF has very nice data-binding.

What if I don't want to choose one or the other?

The beauty is that you don't have to! You can host WinForms controls in WPF and you can host WPF controls inside WinForms. This means that if you are developing a WinForms application and you want to take advantages of WPF, that's ok you can!

So which is easier?

Neither and Both! As for a newbie, both can look a lot similar on the surface, even though it is so different when you go deeper.

They are similar but so different, the thing is that when you start out, you have other things to think about than how the Routing model works and how to adapt to MVVM.

Is XAML dead?

No. XAML isn't dead. WP7 uses Silverlight which is also using XAML. Even though a lot of development in the future can be done with HTML5, I doubt that XAML is about to "die". People asked if WinForms was going to die when WPF was released and it hasn't.

share|improve this answer
21  
+1 Complete answer, with simple examples! –  jorgebg Jul 4 '11 at 9:55
2  
+1 for detailed answer –  Ata Jul 4 '11 at 16:22
    
+1 for the detailed answer, which is still up to date after 1,5 yrs. –  Rob Vermeulen Nov 28 '12 at 16:10
2  
Maybe an interesting extra bit of info about the future of XAML: Windows 8 Apps are made in XAML (or HTML). –  Matthijs Wessels Apr 10 '13 at 9:29
    
+1 for the detailed answer. –  Darwin Gautalius May 19 '13 at 15:33

I like to say it this way

Winforms is easier because it is designed the same way as you would have designed it with your current intelligence and experience level given you had enough time to implement it. Therefor you can just pick it up and start using it the way you think things work. I often guess when developing winforms and 90% of the time it just works that way.

WPF on the other hand is over architectured and trying to be way to smart all the time making it a mess to do the medium range complexity things (guess what's the difference between a UserControl and a CustomControl is and when you have to use which). Super simple stuff as drag and drop editor works to attract users and massive weird things like databinding your application template on the fly with a web service takes 2 lines just for showoff. Anything new you do requires you to look things up in documentation/examples.

Use winforms to get things done and if you need the performance for anything go with Direct2d, microsoft has a managed wrapper for it in the Windows API Code Pack 1.1.

share|improve this answer

In most cases windows forms would suffice. You can implement almost any confounded ui requirement out of windows forms. The same thing you can get out of wpf.

But wpf kind of supports a paradigm called mvvm which separates the UI from the model, and the UI based interactions/validations from both. This makes various aspects of the application independently testable. For e.g. you can take the validation logic, write various test cases around it, and test it independently, without actually disturbing the UI development or the model development.

But this is technically what mvvm offers you? Wpf is a technology that utilizes hardware accelerated graphics, and device indepent pixellation. Meaning your form (as long as it doesn't resize) will look the same on a monitor will lower dpi, or, a higher dpi. (DPI is a measure of pixel density).

Catch the article here:

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/140611/WPF-Tutorial-Beginning

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.