Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Why do we always do this when creating constructors in Objective C?

self = [super init];
if ( self ) {
    //Initialization code here
}
share|improve this question
3  
The question Some beginner Objective-C/iPhone questions asks the same thing in its first part, and you should read Barry's answer there. See also Wil Shipley's "self = [stupid init];" article for more: wilshipley.com/blog/2005/07/self-stupid-init.html –  Brad Larson Jul 3 '11 at 19:24
    
Just found that this is best explained in Lecture 4 (at about 25 min) of Standford iOS Lecture. –  NSExplorer Jul 4 '11 at 21:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

We reassign to self because [super init] is allowed to return a different object than the one it was called on. We if (self) because [super init] is allowed to return nil.

share|improve this answer

you can create constructor and destructor in objective-c with

-(id) init
{
    self = [super init];
    if(self)
    {
       //do something
    }
    return self;
}
-(void) dealloc
{
   [super dealloc];
}
share|improve this answer

self is a class based on some superclass (e.g. UIViewController, NSObject - see your interface file to be sure which one). The superclass might need some form of initialization in order for the subclass to work as expected. So by first initializing the superclass we make sure default properties and the like are set. Without initializing the superclass first, we might experience some very unexpected behavior, especially in more complex objects like ViewControllers and the like.

share|improve this answer
3  
Actually, self in an init method is not a class. It's an uninitialized instance of the current class. –  Chuck Jul 3 '11 at 21:43
    
Yeah, correct. Thanks for the correction. –  Wolfgang Schreurs Jul 4 '11 at 7:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.