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I need to use a bunch of string variables throughout my program. I reassign some of them quite often, while others are stuck with the same value during execution. What's the best practice here?

In the first case, the variables should be NSMutableString and I should cast them to NSString (using the copy method) whenever they need to be arguments of functions that require NSString objects. Is that right?

When I reassign them to other constant values, I shouldn't have to dispose the previous content, right?

As for NSString objects, if I need to assign a new value to them, I guess I should deallocate them, allocate them again, and then assign the new value. Is that correct?

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3 Answers 3

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Unless you're actually modifying a string, you shouldn't use NSMutableString. You're reassigning the whole string to a new value, so stay with a regular NSString. Use the autoreleased versions, because that'll be more efficient than alloc/init/release all the time. You could also just reassign your strings to constants if you know what they'll be assigned to.

In the first case, the variables should be NSMutableString and I should cast them to NSString (using the copy method) whenever they need to be arguments of functions that require NSString objects. Is that right?

Well, you could do it that way, but it would be really inefficient. Remember inheritance—an NSMutableString is an NSString, just with some new stuff tacked on. A simple cast will do the trick:

NSString *string = (NSString *)aMutableString;

Even better though, you don't even have to do that. Because of inheritance, you can directly pass in a mutable string wherever a regular string is required, no casting required. That's the beauty of inheritance.

When I reassign them to other constant values, I shouldn't have to dispose the previous content, right

For neither mutable or immutable strings. Old values are simply overwritten in memory—nothing to dispose of there. As far as the memory management goes, it's really not efficient to literally be creating new strings all the time. Just reassign them. You will never need to alloc/init one string more than once, and that single init should be balanced by a single release.

Addendum: When Should You Use Mutable? A mutable string should be used when you are physically changing the value of the existing string, without completely discarding the old value. Examples might include adding a character to the beginning or the end, or changing a character in the middle. With a mutable string, you can do this "in place"—you'll just modify the existing string. By contrast, an immutable string, once its value is set, cannot change that value. NSString has methods such as stringByAppendingString:, which does add a string to an existing one—but it returns a new string. Behind the scenes, NSString has copied your old string to a new (larger) memory location, added the argument, and returned the new string. That copying is a lot less efficient (relatively speaking, or if you have to do it a lot).

Of course, there's nothing stopping you from physically assigning one string to another. Old values will be overwritten. Most NSStrings, including the @"String Constants", are autoreleased. If you are creating a new string and you decide to alloc/init, you can then assign it to another value without consequence:

myString = anotherString;
myString = myTextField.text;

You can do this with both mutable and immutable strings. The main takeaway is that you should only use mutable when your changing the string itself. But you can change the variable with both mutable and immutable strings without compiler or runtime issues (short of memory management, but most of it is autoreleased anyway).

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As for NSString objects, if I need to assign a new value to them, I guess I should deallocate them, allocate them again, and then assign the new value. Is that correct?

You don't deallocate NSString if you didn't allocated it before, like here:

NSString *string = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"Hello"];

You only need to deallocate it when you call alloc:

NSString *string = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:@"Hello"];
[string release];
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The only difference between NSMutableString* and NSString* is that mutable string can be changed. You don't have to cast anything, since NSMutableString is a subclass of NSString, nor take different memory measures ( so you are right * ).

If you need a modifiable version of a string you just do

NSMutableString* myMutableString = [NSMutableString stringWithString:myString];

You should not 'copy' anything.

Note that if you call :

NSString* myString = myMutableString;

myString is still a mutable String.

So if for any reason (security...) you relly need unmutable strings, you have to call

NSString* myString = [NSString stringWithString:myMutableString];

* you are right, but you could also call [replaceCharactersInRange:withString:] on the mutable string. if there is enough space from previous allocation, then it may be faster, since there is no destruction and new allocation to do.

( Added later : forgot the setString: method )

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"…if there is enough space from previous allocation, then it may be faster, since there is no destruction and new allocation to do"—but you will never know, short of probing the RAM itself, which would be enough overhead to counteract any benefit this route may impart. –  FeifanZ Jul 3 '11 at 22:37
1  
I just guessed Apple, during this 15 years of OpenStep, optimized its NSString class... I made some tests, and I think I'm right. \r1 - stringWithString with shorter string : 0.402674 s 2 - stringWithString with longer string : 0.387015 s 3 - setString with shorter string : 0.152494 s 4 - replaceCharactersInRange with shorter string : 0.183790 s 5 - setString with longer string : 1.522077 s 6 - replaceCharactersInRange with longer string : 0.829953 s –  Tristan Leblanc Jul 4 '11 at 0:49
    
I admit that was not a simple guess.I tested this few years ago for a fractal generation program using very long and changing strings - I agree with you, in common cases, the gain is peanuts... Sorry if we're a bit out of the original subject.. Cheers –  Tristan Leblanc Jul 4 '11 at 1:00
    
Huh…well, go figure. I appreciate the numbers, I never would have expected that. But yeah, it's a matter of tenths of a second, although that is a bigger difference than I would have expected. Dealing with 600 strings would be a minute or more lost/gained right there. ;) –  FeifanZ Jul 4 '11 at 2:00
    
No no ! You were quite right. I did the Test on 100000 strings, not one!!! I deleted it mistakly because I did not have enough chars in the comment.. That the reason it can become important in applications such fractals, big dictionaries handling, or fast refresh of many changing strings (games..). Cheers Again –  Tristan Leblanc Jul 5 '11 at 0:04
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