Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void initializeMap(int mapSizeX, int mapSizeY, int map[][10])
{
    // Map details:
    // 0 = # (wall)
    // 1 = space (free space)
    // 2 = x (player)

    for(int x = 0; x < mapSizeX; x++)
    {
        map[x][0] = 0;
    }

    for(int y = 0; y < (mapSizeY - 2); y++)
    {
        map[0][y] = 0;

        for(int x = 0; x < (mapSizeX - 2); x++)
        {
            map[x][y] = 1;
        }

        map[mapSizeX][y] = 0;
    }

    for(int x = 0; x < mapSizeX; x++)
    {
        map[x][mapSizeY - 1] = 0;
    }
}

void paintMap(int mapSizeX, int mapSizeY, int map[][10])
{
    for(int y = 0; y < mapSizeY; y++)
    {
        for(int x = 0; x < mapSizeX; x++)
        {   
            switch(map[x][y])
            {
                case 0:
                    cout << "#";
                    break;

                case 1:
                    cout << " ";
                    break;

                case 2:
                    cout << "x";
                    break;

            }

            cout << map[x][y];
        }
        cout << endl;
    }
}

int main()
{
    int mapSizeX = 10;
    int mapSizeY = 10;
    int map[10][10];
    initializeMap(mapSizeX, mapSizeY, map);
    paintMap(mapSizeX, mapSizeY, map);

    cout << endl << endl;

    return 0;
}

My code compiles perfectly fine without errors but when I try to run it, it just says "Segmentation fault". I've done some research and I don't understand why I get it because I don't use pointers at all. How do I fix this? I compile it using g++ and run it by just typing ./main in the terminal.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted
map[mapSizeX][y] = 0;

This is illegal. Valid values of the index run from 0 to mapSizeX - 1.

The line should be:

map[mapSizeX][y] = 0;

One assumes that this is the desired output?

#0#0#0#0#0#0#0#0#0#0
#0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1#0
#0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1#0
#0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1#0
#0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1#0
#0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1#0
#0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1#0
#0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1#0
#0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1#0
#0#0#0#0#0#0#0#0#0#0

If so, you have a number of other off-by-one errors in your initializeMap function. Instead of:

for(int y = 0; y < (mapSizeY - 2); y++)

and

for(int x = 0; x < (mapSizeX - 2); x++)

you should use

for(int y = 1; y < (mapSizeY - 1); y++)

and

for(int x = 1; x < (mapSizeX - 1); x++)

respectively.


BTW, here's a cleaner way to write initializeMap:

template<int mapSizeX, int mapSizeY>
void initializeMap(int (&map)[mapSizeX][mapSizeY])
{
  for( int y = 0; y < mapSizeY; y++ ) {
    for( int x = 0; x < mapSizeX; x++ ) {
      if (x == 0 || x + 1 == mapSizeX || y == 0 || y == mapSizeY)
         map[x][y] = 0;
      else
         map[x][y] = 1;
    }
  }
}

And you can call it with just

initializeMap(map);

No need to pass the size, the compiler will figure it out automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that fixed it! The output should be as you described, but without the numbers which was added by accident. – John Moberg Jul 3 '11 at 22:47

I didn't look deep enough to know whether this is the only problem with your code, but

map[mapSizeX][y] = 0;

will write above the bounds of the array.

share|improve this answer

In the second for loop of initializeMap -

map[mapSizeX][y] = 0;

mapSizeX is 10 and there is no 10*y element in the matrix.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.