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Lets say I have the following lines:

1:a:b:c
2:d:e:f
3:a:b
4:a:b:c:d:e:f

how can I edit this with sed (or perl) in order to read:

1a1b1c
2d2e2f
3a3b
4a4b4c4d4e4f

I have done with awk like this:

awk -F':' '{gsub(/:/, $1, $0); print $0}'

but takes ages to complete! So looking for something faster.

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Are you trying to do this in a script or is it more of a one time thing? –  drewag Jul 3 '11 at 23:04
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

'Tis a tad tricky, but it can be done with sed (assuming the file data contains the sample input):

$ sed '/^\(.\):/{
s//\1/
: retry
s/^\(.\)\([^:]*\):/\1\2\1/
t retry
}' data
1a1b1c
2d2e2f
3a3b
4a4b4c4d4e4f
$

You may be able to flatten the script to one line with semi-colons; sed on MacOS X is a bit cranky at times and objected to some parts, so it is split out into 6 lines. The first line matches lines starting with a single character and a colon and starts a sequence of operations for when that is recognized. The first substitute replaces, for example, '1:' by just '1'. The : retry is a label for branching too - a key part of this. The next substitution copies the first character on the line over the first colon. The t retry goes back to the label if the substitute changed anything. The last line delimits the entire sequence of operations for the initially matched line.

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Awesome, exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  SFO Jul 3 '11 at 23:33
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use feature qw/ say /;
use strict;
use warnings;
while( <DATA> ) {
    chomp;
    my @elements = split /:/;
    my $interject = shift @elements;
    local $" = $interject;
    say $interject, "@elements";
}

__DATA__
1:a:b:c
2:d:e:f
3:a:b
4:a:b:c:d:e:f

Or on the linux shell command line:

perl -aF/:/ -pe '$i=shift @F;$_=$i.join $i,@F;' infile.txt

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1  
Which versions of Perl support use feature qq/ say /;, out of curiosity? –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 3 '11 at 23:15
    
From what I recall, 5.10 and up. Otherwise, just use print $interject, "@elements\n"; say is really just a shortcut that saves a few keystrokes. Aside from that there's nothing special about it. –  DavidO Jul 3 '11 at 23:21
    
I should add that I used <DATA> and __DATA__ as a shortcut to include the input data in the working example. If you're reading from a file specified on the command line, and were invoking the Perl script (as opposed to the Perl one-liner), you would change <DATA> to <> and omit the __DATA__ segment. But you probably already figured that out. ;) –  DavidO Jul 3 '11 at 23:36
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#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

while (<DATA>) {
    if ( s/^([^:]+)// ) {
        my $delim = $1;
        s/:/$delim/g;
    }
    print;
}

__DATA__
1:a:b:c
2:d:e:f
3:a:b
4:a:b:c:d:e:f
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You probably need to read the manual here: search and replace

Update: that part of the manual doesn't give a good example. You could use the substitution operator: s/:// or the transliteration operator: tr/://d.

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Transliteration is going to remove the colons, but it won't intersperse the leading 'digits' between each colon-delimited substring. Substitution would have to deal with two conditions, the ^(\d+): situation, which becomes just the digits, and then a global match/substitution of ':' with the leading digits. It would be easiest in two steps, like this: perl -pe 's/^(\d+):/$1 && $i=$1; s/:/$i/g' infile.txt –  DavidO Jul 4 '11 at 1:26
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