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This works:

my %score = ( a => 1, b => 2);
@keys = sort {$score{$a} <=> $score{$b}} keys %score;

But how can I put the code inside {..} to a dedicated sub routine?

sub by_num {
  $score{$a} <=> $score{$b}
}

@keys = sort by_num keys %score;

?

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1  
The dedicated subroutine would have to have access to the hash, or otherwise be passed the values. At which point, it isn't a generically useful subroutine and should just be inlined in your sort. Why do you want a dedicated subroutine? –  ysth Jul 4 '11 at 5:07
    
@ysth,just to get familiar with the syntax.How do you pass the values?It's causing syntax error to me. –  new_perl Jul 4 '11 at 5:38
1  
@ysth There are reasons to use a subroutine instead of a block. For instance, imagine you are sorting a bunch of hashes the same way and at a later date it is decided you should change how they are sorted. If you inlined the sorting function with code blocks you now have to change every instance, but if you had used a function, you could change it in one place. A higher order function is the solution there, but I do have to admit that I have never seen a case like this in the wild. –  Chas. Owens Jul 4 '11 at 6:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The main problem here is having a subroutine that has access to the hash. You either have to create one function per hash you want to sort:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

{
    my %hash = (
        a => 1,
        b => 2,
        c => 3,
    );

    sub sort_hash_a {
        return $hash{$a} <=> $hash{$b};
    }

    for my $k (sort sort_hash_a keys %hash) {
        print "$k\n";
    }
}

{
    my %hash = (
        x => 1,
        y => 2,
        z => 3,
    );

    sub sort_hash_b {
        return $hash{$a} <=> $hash{$b};
    }

    for my $k (sort sort_hash_b keys %hash) {
        print "$k\n";
    }
}

Or create a higher-order function that creates the functions for you:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

sub make_hash_sort {
    my $hashref = shift;

    return sub {
        return $hashref->{$a} <=> $hashref->{$b};
    };
}

my %hash = (
    one   => 1,
    two   => 2,
    three => 3,
);

my $sub = make_hash_sort \%hash;

for my $k (sort $sub keys %hash) {
    print "$k\n";
}

But all of that is, generally, wasted effort for both the programmer and the computer. The block syntax is faster and easier to use in almost all cases. The only exceptions would be complicated sorts or highly repetitive code.

share|improve this answer
    
Owens,for the first solution,the function can't apear before the hash,it seems odd,what's the rationale to mandate this? –  new_perl Jul 4 '11 at 9:42
    
Ideally it should work as long as make_hash_sort is within the scope. –  new_perl Jul 4 '11 at 9:52
    
@new_perl In the first solution we are creating a named closure the closes over the hash. This means the hash must already exist. In the second solution we are creating an anonymous closure that closes over a hashref passed into the function. Since the value closed over is created within the function, you can define make_hash_sort anywhere. Closures are tricky to wrap your head around, you might try reading page 79 of Modern Perl (also available in a print edition). –  Chas. Owens Jul 4 '11 at 12:43

A hash produces a list of key/value pairs in list context; you're then using the values as keys, and there is no e.g. $score{90}. Use keys %score to get just the keys.

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,how to sort when when you can't reference %score in the sort function? –  new_perl Jul 4 '11 at 2:04
    
What? You aren't understanding at all, I take it: you are sorting the keys in %scores, but by saying sort {...} %scores you are giving it both the keys and the values. sort {...} keys %scores does what you want: produces a list of the keys in %scores in descending order by value. –  geekosaur Jul 4 '11 at 2:10
    
%score is lexical my,I can't reference it in the {...}. –  new_perl Jul 4 '11 at 2:14
    
If %score is in scope outside those {...} then it is in scope within them. –  geekosaur Jul 4 '11 at 2:16
    
What about in this case ? sort by_name keys %hash,I need to compare it in an external function. –  new_perl Jul 4 '11 at 2:17

Example passing the sort routine both key and value, requiring some manipulation both before and after the sort:

sub sordid {
    $a->[1] <=> $b->[1];
}

my %score = ( a => 1, b => 2 );
@keys = map $_->[0], sort sordid map [ $_ => $score{$_} ], keys %score;

or using the alternate element-passing flavor of sort (triggered by a prototype):

sub sordid($$) {
    $_[0][1] <=> $_[1][1];
}

my %score = ( a => 1, b => 2 );
@keys = map $_->[0], sort sordid map [ $_ => $score{$_} ], keys %score;

(This is necessary for sort routines designed to be called from other packages, since $a and $b are package variables in the package where sort is called.)

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There is a way of getting the $a and $b variables from the calling package, but it is nasty and the prototype variant is definitely cleaner. –  Chas. Owens Jul 4 '11 at 6:45
    
Some things we don't talk about... –  ysth Jul 4 '11 at 6:50

Don't over-think it, if you want to sort by number, just do that:

%score = ( a => 1, b => 2);

sub keys_sorted_by_num {
  my %h = @_;
  return sort {$h{$a} <=> $h{$b}} keys %h;
}

@keys = keys_sorted_by_num %score;

Less magic makes for clearer code...

share|improve this answer
    
Using a hashref instead of a hash is probably better (you only have to pass one item and return n items instead of passing 2n items and returning n items). Add in wantarray and return an arrayref if in scalar context and you are in business. –  Chas. Owens Jul 4 '11 at 13:22

With a closure!

sub hashsort {
  my %hash = @_;
  return sub { $hash{$a} <=> $hash{$b}; }
}

my $sorter = hashsort(%hash);
@keys = sort $sorter keys %hash;

Ought to work. And no, it would never "remake %hash on every call" because hashsort would only be called once, and the function it returns would be called repeatedly. Though given the increasingly less attractive syntax you might want to abstract the whole thing into a function, i.e.

sub sortkeys (\%) {
  my $hash = shift;
  return sort { $hash->{$a} <=> $hash->{$b} } keys %$hash;
}

@keys = sortkeys %hash;

You may prefer the unprototyped version, and pass the hash as a reference manually (or not as a reference at all).

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Lutz,the performance will be really bad right? Because each time my %hash will be created and destroyed.This makes the decision of making $a and $b global of no use. –  new_perl Jul 4 '11 at 4:47
    
Just tried,it's invalid,syntax error near ") keys" –  new_perl Jul 4 '11 at 4:49
    
@new_perl, you could fix the first problem by either not using Perl, or passing it a reference instead of the hash itself. The latter problem can be fixed with more parentheses. –  siride Jul 4 '11 at 5:12
1  
@Lutz close, but no banana. The sort function is weird, it requires the second argument to be a code bock, a literal function name, or a scalar variable (i.e. you can't use the return value of a function call), so the higher order function needs to be called before the sort call and the result passed to sort in place of the code block. –  Chas. Owens Jul 4 '11 at 6:18
1  
s/banana/onion/ –  ysth Jul 4 '11 at 6:27

Example for sorting in ASC and DESC:

    use strict;

    my %hash = (
        four   => 4,
        one   => 1,
        two   => 2,
        five   => 5,
        three => 3,
    );


    my $sub_asc = make_hash_sort(\%hash,'asc');

    print "--- ASC ---\n";
    for my $k (sort $sub_asc keys %hash) {
        print "$k\t\t$hash{$k}\n";
    }


my $sub_desc = make_hash_sort(\%hash,'desc');

print "\n--- DESC ---\n";
for my $k (sort $sub_desc keys %hash) {
    print "$k\t\t$hash{$k}\n";
}



###  Sort hash by value
sub make_hash_sort {
    my ($hashref, $how) = @_;
    return sub {
        if ($how eq 'asc') {
            return $hashref->{$a} <=> $hashref->{$b};
        } elsif ($how eq 'desc') {
            return $hashref->{$b} <=> $hashref->{$a};
        }
    };
}
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