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I have two tables named table_1 (1GB) and reference (250Mb).

When I query a cross join on reference it takes 16hours to update table_1 .. We changed the system files EXT3 for XFS but still it's taking 16hrs.. WHAT AM I DOING WRONG??

Here is the update/cross join query :

  mysql> UPDATE table_1 CROSS JOIN reference ON
  -> (table_1.start >= reference.txStart AND table_1.end <= reference.txEnd)
  -> SET table_1.name = reference.name;
  Query OK, 17311434 rows affected (16 hours 36 min 48.62 sec)
  Rows matched: 17311434  Changed: 17311434  Warnings: 0

Here is a show create table of table_1 and reference:

    CREATE TABLE `table_1` (
     `strand` char(1) DEFAULT NULL,
     `chr` varchar(10) DEFAULT NULL,
     `start` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
     `end` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
     `name` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
     `name2` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
     KEY `annot` (`start`,`end`)
   ) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 ;


   CREATE TABLE `reference` (
     `bin` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL,
     `name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
     `chrom` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
     `strand` char(1) NOT NULL,
     `txStart` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
     `txEnd` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
     `cdsStart` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
     `cdsEnd` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
     `exonCount` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
     `exonStarts` longblob NOT NULL,
     `exonEnds` longblob NOT NULL,
     `score` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
     `name2` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
     `cdsStartStat` enum('none','unk','incmpl','cmpl') NOT NULL,
     `cdsEndStat` enum('none','unk','incmpl','cmpl') NOT NULL,
     `exonFrames` longblob NOT NULL,
      KEY `chrom` (`chrom`,`bin`),
      KEY `name` (`name`),
      KEY `name2` (`name2`),
      KEY `annot` (`txStart`,`txEnd`)
   ) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 ;
share|improve this question
1  
The tables do not have Primary Keys? –  ypercube Jul 4 '11 at 3:02
1  
There is no need to SHOUT in your question title.... –  slugster Jul 4 '11 at 3:04
    
where did I shout in my question title?? –  madkitty Jul 4 '11 at 8:41
    
Indeed the tables do not have Primary Keys because ... I'm still wondering if its really helpful to add Primary Keys.. –  madkitty Jul 4 '11 at 8:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I see 2 problems with the UPDATE statement.

There is no index for the End fields. The compound indexes (annot) you have will be used only for the start fields in this query. You should add them as suggested by Emre:

ALTER TABLE `table_1` ADD INDEX ( `end` ) ;
ALTER TABLE `reference` ADD INDEX ( `txEnd` ) ;

Second, the JOIN may (and probably does) find many rows of table reference that are related to a row of table_1. So some (or all) rows of table_1 that are updated, are updated many times. Check the result of this query, to see if it is the same as your updated rows count (17311434):

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM table_1
  WHERE EXISTS
    ( SELECT *
      FROM reference
      WHERE table_1.start >= reference.txStart
        AND table_1.`end` <= reference.txEnd
    )

There can be other ways to write this query but the lack of a PRIMARY KEY on both tables makes it harder. If you define a primary key on table_1, try this, replacing id with the primary key.

Update: No, do not try it on a table with 34M rows. Check the execution plan and try with smaller tables first.

UPDATE table_1 AS t1
  JOIN 
    ( SELECT t2.id
           , r.name
      FROM table_1 AS t2
        JOIN
          ( SELECT name, txStart, txEnd
            FROM reference
            GROUP BY txStart, txEnd
          ) AS r
          ON  t2.start >= r.txStart
          AND t2.`end` <= r.txEnd
      GROUP BY t2.id
    ) AS good
    ON good.id = t1.id
SET t1.name = good.name;

You can check the query plan by running EXPLAIN on the equivalent SELECT:

EXPLAIN
SELECT t1.id, t1.name, good.name
FROM table_1 AS t1
  JOIN 
    ( SELECT t2.id
           , r.name
      FROM table_1 AS t2
        JOIN
          ( SELECT name, txStart, txEnd
            FROM reference
            GROUP BY txStart, txEnd
          ) AS r
          ON  t2.start >= r.txStart
          AND t2.`end` <= r.txEnd
      GROUP BY t2.id
    ) AS good
    ON good.id = t1.id ;
share|improve this answer
    
WOW Thanks a lot :) I added a column 'id' auto_increment primary key on both tables. From table_1 multiple rows can match the same name in 'reference' (800 rows in average). Let's say I run the UPDATE JOIN ON good.id = t1.id --> if 800 rows from table_1 matches one name in 'reference' that will update 800 times the column name in table_1, right ? :) –  madkitty Jul 4 '11 at 10:23
    
@madkitty: What does my SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table_1 WHERE EXISTS ... returns? –  ypercube Jul 4 '11 at 10:31
    
@madkitty: Did you add the two end indexes? –  ypercube Jul 4 '11 at 10:33
    
To answer your question, if 800 rows from table_1 match one name in 'reference', that will update those 800 rows in table_1. –  ypercube Jul 4 '11 at 10:36
    
yes I did added the two end indexes, I ran the query SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table_1 WHERE EXISTS ( SELECT * FROM reference WHERE table_1.start >= reference.txStart AND table_1.end <= reference.txEnd ) --> I ran this 1 hour ago, it's still running. –  madkitty Jul 4 '11 at 11:48

You should index table_1.start, reference.txStart, table_1.end and reference.txEnd table fields:

ALTER TABLE `table_1` ADD INDEX ( `start` ) ;
ALTER TABLE `table_1` ADD INDEX ( `end` ) ;
ALTER TABLE `reference` ADD INDEX ( `txStart` ) ;
ALTER TABLE `reference` ADD INDEX ( `txEnd` ) ;
share|improve this answer

Cross joins are Cartesian Products, which are probably one of the most computationally expensive things to compute (they don't scale well).

For each table T_i for i = 1 to n, the number of rows generated by crossing tables T_1 to T_n is the size of each table multiplied by the size of each other table, ie

|T_1| * |T_2| * ... * |T_n|

Assuming each table has M rows, the resulting cost of computing the cross join is then

M_1 * M_2 ... M_n = O(M^n)

which is exponential in the number of tables involved in the join.

share|improve this answer
1  
What you say it's true but in MySQL a CROSS JOIN b ON join_condition is equivalent to a INNER JOIN b ON join_condition –  ypercube Jul 4 '11 at 2:54
    
Did not know that, cool, learn something new everyday ;) –  Cupcake Jul 4 '11 at 2:55

Try this:

UPDATE table_1 SET
table_1.name = (
  select reference.name
  from reference
  where table_1.start >= reference.txStart
  and table_1.end <= reference.txEnd)
share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure this is equivalent? –  ypercube Jul 4 '11 at 2:57
    
The subquery may even return more than 1 row and raise error. –  ypercube Jul 4 '11 at 3:15
    
then OP's original query will also fail, no? –  Bohemian Jul 4 '11 at 7:37
    
I think it won't fail but update table_1 rows multiple times (once for every match) and that's one of the reasons it's slow. –  ypercube Jul 4 '11 at 8:07
    
I though my query was slow coz our data are two big.. table_1 has 34994288 rows and reference has 1560 rows. Maybe the design is wrong.. –  madkitty Jul 4 '11 at 8:35

Somebody already offered you to add some indexes. But I think the best performance you may get with these two indexes:

ALTER TABLE `test`.`time` 
    ADD INDEX `reference_start_end` (`txStart` ASC, `txEnd` ASC),
    ADD INDEX `table_1_star_end` (`start` ASC, `end` ASC);

Only one of them will be used by MySQL query, but MySQL will decide which is more useful automatically.

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