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I am trying to create an anagram solver just using a very basic, procedural approach. I am finding out that I probably should have done this using classes, but now it is too late and my assignment is about due. Any suggestions on how to figure this out would be great!

Basically, this is what the algorithm should do:

  1. Get all words in the dictionary; store them in a container
  2. Get a word from the user; quit if appropriate
  3. Get all permutations of the word that the user entered
  4. Strip the word the user entered from the permutations
  5. Strip all words in the permutation collection that aren't also in the dictionary I collected in part 1

Now for the last step, I must make sure that I don't display duplicate anagrams (i.e. anagrams which contain the same letter, such as "loop"). I cannot seem to get this check to work, which is noted below with under the TODO comment block.

Any suggestions would be awesome!!

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

//
// Change size below to accomodate more anagrams and dictionary words
//
#define MAX_ANGM_SIZE  4096
#define MAX_WORD_SIZE  1048576

using namespace std;


//
// Determines whether anagram is valid or not; will not display word
// which user entered or words not contained in dictionary
//
bool isValidAnagram(string word, string userWord,
                string dictionary[], unsigned int listIdx)
{
    for(unsigned int idx = 0; idx < listIdx; ++idx)
    {
        if(word == userWord)
            return false;
        else if (word == dictionary[idx])
            return true;
    }

    return false;
}


//
// Determines whether user's word is contained in the dictionary
// or not
//
bool isValidWord(string word, string dictionary[], 
             unsigned int listIdx)
{
    for(unsigned int idx = 0; idx < listIdx; ++idx)
    {
        if(word == dictionary[idx])
            return true;
    }

    return false;
}


//
// TODO:This function should test for duplicate anagrams and return
// true if duplicates are found.
//
bool isRepeated(string anagrams[], unsigned int anaIdx)
{
    for(unsigned int idx = anaIdx; idx != 0; --idx)
    {
        if(anagrams[idx] == anagrams[anaIdx])
            return true;
        else 
            return false;
    }

    return false;
}


//
// Only display elements in array which aren't blank and don't 
// display duplicate anagrams; notify user if no anagrams
// were found.
//
void displayAnagrams(string anagrams[], unsigned int next)
{
    int flag = 0;

    for (unsigned int idx = 0; idx < next; ++idx)
    {

        if((anagrams[idx] != "") || (!(isRepeated(anagrams, idx))))
        {
            if(idx == 1)
                cout << "  Anagrams: ";
            if(idx > 0)
                flag = 1;

            cout << anagrams[idx] << " ";
        }
        else 
            continue;
    }

    if(flag == 0)
        cout << "  no anagrams found" << endl;
}


static void swap(char &c1, char &c2)
{
    char temp = c1;

    c1 = c2;
    c2 = temp;
}


//
// Pass in word to be altered, the userWord for comparison, the array to store
// anagrams, the dictionary for comparison, the count for the number of anagrams
// and the count for number of dictionary words
//
static void permute(string word, string userWord, int k, string anagrams[],
                string dictionary[], unsigned int &next, unsigned    int listIdx)
{   
    if(k == word.length()-1)
    {
        if(isValidAnagram(word, userWord, dictionary, listIdx))
            anagrams[next] = word;

        ++next;
    }
    else
    {
        for(int idx = k; idx < word.length(); ++idx)
        {
            swap(word[k], word[idx]);
            permute(word, userWord, k+1, anagrams, dictionary, next, listIdx);
        }
    }
}


//
// Create container to store anagrams, validate user's word in dictionary, get all
// of the anagrams, then display all valid anagrams
//
void getAnagrams(string word, string dictionary[], unsigned int listIdx)
{
    string anagrams[MAX_ANGM_SIZE];
    unsigned int next = 0;

    if(isValidWord(word, dictionary, listIdx))
    {
        permute(word, word, 0, anagrams, dictionary, next, listIdx);
    }
    else
    {
        cerr << "  \"" << word << "\"" << " is not a valid word" << endl;
        return;
    }

    displayAnagrams(anagrams, next);
}


//
// Read in dictionary file, store contents of file in a list, prompt
// the user to type in words to generate anagrams
//
int main()
{
    string file;
    string word;
    string quit = "quit";
    string dictionary[MAX_WORD_SIZE];

    unsigned int idx = 0;

    cout << "Enter a dictionary file: ";
    cin  >> file;
    cout << "Reading file \"" << file << "\"" << endl;
    cout << endl;

    ifstream inFile(file.c_str());

        if(!(inFile.is_open())) 
    {
        cerr << "Can't open file \"" << file << "\""
         << endl;

        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    while(!inFile.eof())
    {
        inFile >> dictionary[idx];
        ++idx;
    }

    inFile.close();

    while(true)
    {
        cout << "Enter a word: ";
        cin  >> word;

        if(word == quit) break;

        getAnagrams(word, dictionary, idx);

        cout << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
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1  
Why avoid use of the STL? (After all, you're using string, which fits most of the requirements of STL containers...) –  Billy ONeal Jul 4 '11 at 4:22
    
This is actually for a class on STL, but this is the first assignment and I haven't used STL yet. The goal for this assignment is to use standard techniques and then do the exact same assignment at the end of the term once we know how to use STL. –  Dylan Jul 4 '11 at 4:25
    
Ah, I see. Well, just an FYI then -- std::string exposes a mostly STL sequence container interface. (However, the strings library predates the STL's inclusion in the standard by a while if you want to get pedantic ) –  Billy ONeal Jul 4 '11 at 4:30
    
if it's about an assignment, please add tag homework –  Bruce Jul 4 '11 at 5:00
    
@Dylan: Sorry to hear that is the approach to learning in your school (which by the way, is the same I had). You might want to suggest to your instructor that it is probably better to do it the other way around: learn how to solve things using high level constructs, and learn the basics of the language and problem solving as you do so. Then learn the harder low level details reimplementing what you already had manually, where the goal is not to solve a problem (algorithm would be known at this time), but solve the details of manual implementations. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 4 '11 at 7:50

2 Answers 2

You may want to rethink your step (3). If the user enters a 12-letter word you have 479,001,600 permutations of it which will probably be impractical to assemble all at once (and if that's not, then a 16-letter word will be...).

Instead, try thinking about how you could store the words and look up potential anagrams in a way that doesn't require you to do that.

Edit: I get that ability to solve largeish words may not be your biggest concern at this point, but it might actually make your fourth and fifth steps easier if you do them by assembling the set of valid words rather than starting with all possibilities and removing all the ones that don't match. 'Removing' an item from an array is a bit awkward since you have to shuffle all the following items up to fill in the gap (this is exactly the kind of thing that STL manages for you).

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I thought about that too. 12 factorial is an ugly number. But hey, if it works (even if it is impractical), I will take what I can get at this point. Thanks. –  Dylan Jul 4 '11 at 4:44

Better algorithm : don't store your word, but store a tupple containing (your word, sorted letters). Moreover, you sort that big storage by the second key (hint, you could use a sqlite database to do the work for you and use an index (can't be unique!))

E.g. to store

"Florent", "Abraham","Zoe"

you would store in memory

("aaabhmr", "abraham"),("eflnort","florent"),("eoz","zoe")

When you got your word from your user, you just use same "sorting letter inside word" algorithm.

Then you look for that pattern in your storage, and you find all anagrams very quickly (log(size of dictionary)) as it's sorted. Of course, original words are the second elements of your tuple.

You can do that using classes, standard structures, a database, up to you to choose the easiest implementation (and the one fitting your requirements)

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