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I have the same PHP problem as bob_cobb. Here's Brad Chrisite's answer:

Order of operations.

Place your session creation and test-for-validity check at the very top of the page so the rest of the page can make judgment calls off the existence of $_SESSION['username']

(Chances are you're trying to validate them inside the content area so your "yay" or "ney" message appears in the desired section of the document. Pretty, yes, but the whole top-half of the page can't see that it's [potentially] a valid session.)

He is basically saying that session_start() and the conditionals that check for session variables should be at the top, so that the rest of the page could act based upon that.

However, my session-check is at the top of the page.

<?php
session_start();

if ($_SESSION['username']) 
//User is already logged in, echo the log out button.
...    

else 
//User is not logged in, echo the log in form & button.
...    

//Login form validation if user is not logged in and submitted form.
//At the end, create session variable ($_SESSION['username'])

//Destroy session if user pressed log out button.
session_destroy();
?>

Everything works fine, but, as with the poster of the other question, I have to refresh my page, to get the top script executed (the script that checks for $_SESSION['username']).

Why is that?

share|improve this question
    
@user805556, what exactly is the problem? We need much more information to help you. Start by explaining what is in $_SESSION and where it gets set. –  Brad Jul 4 '11 at 4:56
    
I thought I made the problem pretty clear. Just like the other guy, my scripts that are supposed to read for session variables only get executed after a refresh. $_SESSION accesses the document's session, and gets set when the user logs in. I'll add that. –  LonelyWebCrawler Jul 4 '11 at 4:58
    
@AlienWebguy I didn't know that people actually take the points so seriously... –  LonelyWebCrawler Jul 4 '11 at 5:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Do not echo anything before your entire control flow is finished. What I mean by this is that you should work to separate logic from display (even better: use a pattern like Model-View-Controller). In your case, maybe you can do something like this:

<?php
/* Place all your control logic at the beginning.
   Do not echo anything in this block. */

session_start();

if ($_SESSION['username']) {
  $loggedin = true;
} else {
  $loggedin = false;
  ...    

  //Login form validation if user is not logged in and submitted form.
  //If login succeeded, set $loggedin to true.
  //At the end, create session variable.
}

//Destroy session if user pressed log out button.
  session_destroy();

/* Only display logic below, we do not change any state here */

if($loggedin) {
  echo logout button
} else {
  echo login form
}
?>
share|improve this answer
    
I'll try your solution. –  LonelyWebCrawler Jul 4 '11 at 5:00
    
It works, I just forgot to set $loggedin to true before. Thanks so much. –  LonelyWebCrawler Jul 4 '11 at 5:11

The answer is simple. You need not unset the session after making the user registration. Try this

<?php
session_start();

if ($_SESSION['username']) 
//User is already logged in, echo the log out button.
...    

else 
//User is not logged in, echo the log in form & button.
...    

//Login form validation if user is not logged in and submitted form.
//At the end, create session variable.

//Destroy session if user pressed log out button.
//session_destroy();
--- do a redirect or a refresh here .... 
?>
share|improve this answer
    
How do I do a redirect or refresh? I thought that that's only possible in the header. Do you mean via Javascript? That doesn't work, I tried it. –  LonelyWebCrawler Jul 4 '11 at 4:55
    
Where he does redirect, you use PHP's header() –  Josh Jul 4 '11 at 4:57
    
Yes, but then I can't put that at the bottom of the page. I thought headers have to go on the top. –  LonelyWebCrawler Jul 4 '11 at 5:00

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