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I'm studying c++ on my own time, and writing a linked list to try and get the hang of it. I'm worried about the way i've come up to delete the object. It's a singly linked list. here's the destructor:

template <typename T>
LinkedList<T>::~LinkedList() 
{
  Node<T> * current = this->first;
  do {
    Node * temp = current->next;
    delete current; // THIS JUST MIGHT BE A TERRIBLE IDEA!!!
    Node * current = temp; // new current-- might work with the current
                           // delete a line above
  } while (current->next != 0); // need to leave this->last so that i don't
                                // delete it twice in the next line.
                                // Just realized i'm deleting this->first, then 
                                // in the next line [implicitly] deleting it again!
                                // 
  delete this;
}

I create a pointer to the first node in the list, create a temporary pointer to the next node, delete the first pointer, create a new pointer with the same name, which then loops back. after it's done, it deletes the 'this' pointer.

I'm sure you can see why i'm worried with the way i create a new pointer with the same name as a deleted pointer.

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what is your question? –  NirMH Jul 4 '11 at 6:00
    
oops. I would like to know if creating a pointer, delete it, then make another one with the same name in a loop is kosher. –  fishin4guitars Jul 4 '11 at 6:09
    
@fishin4guitars: watch out, tabs don't play well with Markdown. I took the liberty to reindent the code using blanks only. –  Matthieu M. Jul 4 '11 at 6:54
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. Don't delete this in the destructor.
  2. If Node is a template, then you need to write Node<T> in all of those definitions.
  3. Don't redefine current, just assign it a new value.

Other than that, I don't see any other problems in this snippet.

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Thanks. From your answer, it seems like I made a couple incorrect assumptions: 1- that I need to explicitly delete the object, and that deleting a pointer means I can't use it (not just shouldn't). Thanks for catching the missing template. It wasn't intentional. :) –  fishin4guitars Jul 4 '11 at 6:15
1  
@fishin4guitars: delete does not the delete the pointer, but what it points to. Therefore, you can use the pointer after a delete, to either read the address within or assign it a new value, however you cannot use what it pointed to, because it's been wiped out. –  Matthieu M. Jul 4 '11 at 6:56
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~LinkedList
{
//...
  delete this;
}

delete this; in a destructor is like a code-suicide. Your object is already getting destructed and you are again destructing with delete this;. It's an undefined behavior. You can remove that. Rest of things look fine (assuming that this->first gives the head Node).

Edit: I missed that, you have redefined current. Remove that. (should be simply current = temp;)

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Why not compile the code, try it, and see what happens? The worst thing that would happen would be that your program crashes and you have to figure out why.

Your code should basically work except that you need to test current in the while loop condition instead of current->next and it is redundant (and probably wrong) to write delete this in a destructor, and there are some more errors that Cat Plus Plus pointed out in his answer.

If you're trying to learn C++, then you should learn more of it to the point where you understand the mistakes you made here and are confident that the fixed code will work.

Here is my fixed version of the function:

template <typename T> LinkedList<T>::~LinkedList() 
{
    Node<T> * current = this->first;
    while(current != 0) {
        Node<T> * temp = current->next;
        delete current;
        current = temp;
    }
    delete this;
}
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I don't see the question but I see lots of errors:

template <typename T>
LinkedList<T>::~LinkedList() 
{
    Node<T>* current = this->first; // you never check if this->first is 0
    do {
        Node * temp = current->next;
        delete current; // THIS is not a problem
        Node * current = temp; /* this line has no effect -
                     you define new variable and it disappears when reaches
                     the end of its scope next line */
    } while (current->next != 0); /* 'current' is always 'this->first' but
              even if you would assign it 'temp' like you intended few lines
              above you never check if 'current' is 0 so you will
              dereference 0 when you reach the end of the list */

    delete this; /* this line is total nonsense
            if your LinkedList is created with 'new LinkedList' then
            you have infinite recursion (you call destructor from destructor)
            otherwise you 'delete' pointer that you never 'new'-ed */
}

The correct code is this:

template <typename T>
LinkedList<T>::~LinkedList() 
{
    Node<T>* current = this->first;
    while (current != 0)
    {
        Node<T>* temp = current->next;
        delete current;
        current = temp;
    }
}
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Thanks. This is why I'm trying to get a better feel for the language. –  fishin4guitars Jul 4 '11 at 6:18
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