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I have a user function that returns a BIT calle dbo.IsPartReady. I am trying to use the function inside of a trigger as follows:

SET @railReady = dbo.IsPartReady(1,@curPartiId);
SET @frameReady = dbo.IsPartReady(2,@curPartiId);
SET @dryAReady = dbo.IsPartReady(3,@curPartiId);
SET @dryBReady = dbo.IsPartReady(4,@curPartiId);

IF ( (@railReady AND @frameReady ) OR ( @dryAReady AND @dryBReady ) )

I'm getting the following error in the IF statement: An expression of non-boolean type specified in a context where a condition is expected, near 'AND'.

What am I doing wrong ?

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in which way the local variables are declared? please, show the code –  heximal Jul 4 '11 at 8:57
1  
Unless @curPartiId is being set inside a while loop (shudder) or a cursor loop (double shudder), it's quite likely your trigger is broken for multi-row operations also. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 4 '11 at 9:10
1  
Agreed Damien (+1), except there isn't really much difference (so not sure why you shudder differently). A while loop is just a cursor without DECLARE CURSOR. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 4 '11 at 16:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

BIT data type in SQL Server is not a boolean it is an integer. You have to compare the value of the variable with something to get a boolean expression. BIT can have the value 0, 1 or NULL. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177603.aspx

declare @B bit = 1

if @B = 1
begin
  print 'Yes'
end
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Use the following:

IF ((@railReady = 1 AND @frameReady = 1) OR (@dryAReady = 1 AND @dryBReady = 1))

or alternatively,

IF ((@railReady & @frameReady) | (@dryAReady & @dryBReady)) = 1

More information:

To verify this we can use a truth table containing all combinations of four bit values:

WITH B(x) AS (SELECT CAST(0 AS bit) UNION ALL SELECT CAST(1 AS bit))
, AllSixteenCombinations(a,b,c,d) AS
    (SELECT * FROM B B1 CROSS JOIN B B2 CROSS JOIN B B3 CROSS JOIN B B4)
SELECT a,b,c,d
, CASE WHEN ((a = 1 AND b = 1) OR (c = 1 AND d = 1)) THEN 'Y' ELSE 'N' END[Logic]
, CASE WHEN ((a & b) | (c & d)) = 1 THEN 'Y' ELSE 'N' END [Bitwise]
FROM AllSixteenCombinations

Output:

a     b     c     d     Logic Bitwise
----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -------
0     0     0     0     N     N
0     1     0     0     N     N
0     0     1     0     N     N
0     1     1     0     N     N
1     0     0     0     N     N
1     1     0     0     Y     Y
1     0     1     0     N     N
1     1     1     0     Y     Y
0     0     0     1     N     N
0     1     0     1     N     N
0     0     1     1     Y     Y
0     1     1     1     Y     Y
1     0     0     1     N     N
1     1     0     1     Y     Y
1     0     1     1     Y     Y
1     1     1     1     Y     Y

(16 row(s) affected)
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For your first example, I strongly recommend always using parentheses when combining AND and OR. For the second one, I'm not sure what language this is meant to be in, but I certainly couldn't get anything similar working in T-SQL. Can you post an actual working line of code that you've tried? –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 4 '11 at 16:36
    
Worked like a charm for me in 2005, interesting + 1 –  t-clausen.dk Jul 5 '11 at 11:20

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