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How do you do a deep copy an object in .Net (C# specifically)?

Please have a look at the code below (excerpt from a C# book):

namespace Example
{
    class MyClass
    {
        public int val;
    }
    struct myStruct
    {
        public int val;
    }
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyClass objectA = new MyClass();
            MyClass objectB = objectA;
            objectA.val = 10;
            objectB.val = 20;
            myStruct structA = new myStruct();
            myStruct structB = structA;
            structA.val = 30;
            structB.val = 40;
            Console.WriteLine("objectA.val = {0}", objectA.val);
            Console.WriteLine("objectB.val = {0}", objectB.val);
            Console.WriteLine("structA.val = {0}", structA.val);
            Console.WriteLine("structB.val = {0}", structB.val);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

I understands it produces the output below

objectA.val = 20
objectA.val = 20
structB.val = 30
structB.val = 40

The last two lines of the output I have no problem with, but the first two tell me that objectA and objectB are pointing to the same memory block (since in C#, objects are reference types).

The question is how do make objectB, a copy of objectA so that it points to a different area in memory. I understand that trying to assign their members may not work since those members may be references, too. So how do I go about making objectB a completely different entity from objectA?

Thanks

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marked as duplicate by Armen Tsirunyan, ChrisWue, spender, Bo Persson, Graviton Jul 4 '11 at 10:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This might help: stackoverflow.com/questions/129389/… –  vines Jul 4 '11 at 9:23
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7 Answers 7

up vote 16 down vote accepted

There is no built-in way. You can have MyClass implement the IClonable interface (but it is deprecated) or just write your own Copy/Clone method. You will have to write some code.

For big objects you could consider Serialization + Deserialization (through a MemoryStream), just to reuse existing code.

Whatever the method, think carefully about what "a copy" means exactly. How deep should it go, are there Id fields etc.

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I'm sorry, I know this is a really old post but could you provide a link to documentation that says ICloneable is deprecated? I looked at the documentation for .net 4.5 and ICloneable doesn't say anything about being deprecated. If it is then I'd like to use something else. –  vane Jun 13 at 15:57
1  
Never mind, I found it. In the .NET documentation they "recommend that ICloneable not be implemented in public APIs". So it's not deprecated, just not recommended to be used. –  vane Jun 13 at 16:03
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You could do:

class myClass : ICloneable
{
    public String test;
    public object Clone()
    {
        return this.MemberwiseClone();
    }
}

then you can do

    myClass a = new myClass();
   myClass b = (myClass)a.Clone();
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6  
-1 for not mentioning about shallow/deep cloning and their effects. Without this information, MemberwiseClone() is tricky. –  Anar Khalilov Jan 17 at 14:57
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The easiest way to do this is writing a copy constructor in the MyClass class.

Something like this:

namespace Example
{
    class MyClass
    {
        public int val;

        public MyClass()
        {
        }

        public MyClass(MyClass other)
        {
            val = other.val;
        }
    }
}

Wich simply accepts a parameter of his own type (the one you want to copy) and creates a new object assigned with the same value

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MyClass objectA = new MyClass();
        MyClass objectB = new MyClass(objectA);
        objectA.val = 10;
        objectB.val = 20;
        Console.WriteLine("objectA.val = {0}", objectA.val);
        Console.WriteLine("objectB.val = {0}", objectB.val);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

output:

objectA.val = 10

objectA.val = 20
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1  
This is good in studying. Not for practicing. –  Shinigamae Apr 11 '13 at 4:16
    
The second line of the output should be objectB.val = 20, couldn't edit because the edit is too small –  jingtao May 20 at 9:44
3  
The problem with copy constructors is that if you add/remove fields, you also have to modify the copy constructor. This can become a maintenance nightmare. Especially for objects with many, many fields (50+ i.e. a DataContract). –  crush May 28 at 18:47
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There's already a question about this, you could perhaps read it

Cloning objects in C#

There's no Clone() method as it exists in Java for example, but you could include a copy constructor in your clases, that's another good approach.

class A
{
  private int attr

  public int Attr
  {
     get { return attr; }
     set { attr = value }
  }

  public A()
  {
  }

  public A(A p)
  {
     this.attr = p.Attr;
  }  
}

This would be an example, copying the member 'Attr' when building the new object.

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You will have to do something like:

MyObject objectB = new MyObject();
objectB.val = objectA.val;

i.e. actually create a new instance of MyObject. For this case it's trivial but if your class is more complex then you should encapsulate this in a copy method.

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Your objects needs to implement ICloneable interface, so you'll be able to "clone" your object like so:

MyClass objectB = objectA.Clone();
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Seems to be available since 3.0 or 3.5 .NET FX. –  jgemedina Jul 4 '11 at 9:28
    
@jgeme : No it is available since Fx 1.1 –  Henk Holterman Jul 4 '11 at 9:31
    
cool, if it is deprecated as some people say, a copy constructor could be another option. –  jgemedina Jul 4 '11 at 9:33
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you can follow this page of msdn library

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.icloneable.aspx

Bye

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