Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assume following code,

NSString *str=[[NSString alloc] initWithString:@"sagar"];


[str autorelease];

I have seen many times that, Most of the programmers do prefer to put alloc, init simultaneously within one statement.

Here, I am asking for the possibility of dividing autorelease for next statement.

  • For example, It is recommended to put init with alloc statement. Is it same for autorelease ?
share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Most of the programmers do prefer to put alloc, init simultaneously within one statement.

That’s because the instance returned by the initialiser is not necessarily the one returned by +alloc. For example, this is wrong and will crash your program:

NSString *str = [NSString alloc];
[str initWithString:@"sagar"];

because in this case -initWithString: causes the deallocation of the previous instance, and str ends up pointing to a deallocated object. This can be fixed by:

NSString *str = [NSString alloc];
str = [str initWithString:@"sagar"];

so that str points to the different instance returned by -initWithString:. The form:

NSString *str = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:@"sagar"];

guarantees that str points to the correct instance.


That said, -autorelease is different. Unless it’s been overridden by an evil djinn, it always returns the receiver itself. This means that both:

NSString *str = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:@"sagar"];
str = [str autorelease];

and:

NSString *str = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:@"sagar"];
[str autorelease];

are correct and work in the same manner.

As for the distinction between:

NSString *str = [[[NSString alloc] initWithString:@"sagar"] autorelease];

and:

NSString *str = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:@"sagar"];
…
[str autorelease];

some people prefer to use -autorelease in tandem with allocation to avoid forgetting to autorelease the instance later. Others prefer to place it in the return statement (if any):

NSString *str = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:@"sagar"];
…
return [str autorelease];

to make (more) explicit that the method/function returns an autoreleased object.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 : good explanation ... –  Jhaliya Jul 4 '11 at 10:13
add comment

You can use autorelease anywhere within the scope, in fact the most common usage is

return [object autorelease]

When you want to return an object to the caller.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can do this

MyObject* foo = [[MyObject alloc] init];
...
[foo autorelease];
...
return foo;

or this

MyObject* foo = [[MyObject alloc] init];
...
...
return [foo autorelease];

or this

MyObject* foo = [[[MyObject alloc] init] autorelease];
...
...
return foo;

I would go with either the second or third, but it's personal preference.

If it's a temporary object that you don't return, you can do this:

MyObject* foo = [[MyObject alloc] init];
...
[foo autorelease];
...
return somethingElse;  

or this

MyObject* foo = [[[MyObject alloc] init] autorelease];
...
...
return somethingElse;    

or this

MyObject* foo = [[MyObject alloc] init];
...
[foo release];
...
return somethingElse;  

In this case, I don't think you ever see the first option. After all, why do autorelease when you can also do release. You see the second option quite a lot. It means you don't have to remember to do the release later. You also see the third option a lot. It has the advantage on iOS of not holding on to unneeded memory for longer than necessary.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes, you can put autorelease in next statement, but the scope of this str will be local and when control is out of scope, this string will be released....

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.