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i've managed to create some preperty class with all the thing we expect from one. I mean when using it you don't need to call functions just using operator = will do all the work. but there is only one thing I guess it would be nice if we could resolve :

template <class T, class X,void (T::*setFunc)(const X&),const X& (T::*getFunc)()const> class property
{ 
    T* const owner;
    X data;
    friend T;
    property(T*const  pOwner) : owner (pOwner)
    {
    }
public:
    property& operator = (const X& input){(owner->*setFunc)(input);return *this;}
    operator const X&()const {return (owner->*getFunc)();}
};

struct c
{
protected:
    void setInt(const int& data);
    const int& getInt() const;
public:
    c();
    property<c, int ,&setInt,&getInt> myInt;
};

c::c() : myInt(this)
{
}

void c::setInt(const int& data)
{
    myInt.data = data;
}
const int& c::getInt() const
{
    return myInt.data;
}

see class property has 4 arguments and the first argument is the class type itself. I'd like to know if we could possibly do anything to extract class type from two function pointers property needs. somwthing like property <int, &setInt, &getInt> myInt;.

do you know any way to eliminate first template parameter?

share|improve this question
3  
friend T; is technically valid only starting with C++0x. – Armen Tsirunyan Jul 4 '11 at 9:42
24  
"temple of template". Are you a member of a C++ cult ? – slaphappy Jul 4 '11 at 9:44
3  
The sample code will not work - you need to use &c::setInt and &c::getInt. – Karel Petranek Jul 4 '11 at 9:46
    
Could you add an example where using property <int, &c::setInt, &c::getInt> is better than property <c, int, &c::setInt, &c::getInt>? – evnu Jul 4 '11 at 9:47
2  
@evnu: I'm guessing it would be less typing and thus less error prone. – Nicol Bolas Jul 4 '11 at 9:54
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you'd like to omit specifying the type parameters explicitly, the following code will meet the purpose. However, this code requires VC2010.

template <class> struct class_type;
template <class C, class T> struct class_type< T(C::*) > { typedef C type; };

template <class> struct param_type;
template <class C, class T> struct param_type< void(C::*)(const T&) > {
    typedef T type;
};

template <class S, S setFunc, class G, G getFunc> struct property {
    typedef typename class_type<S>::type T;
    typedef typename param_type<S>::type X;
    T* const owner;
    X data;
    ....
};

#define PROPERTY(set, get) property<decltype(&set), &set, decltype(&get), &get>

struct c {
    void setInt(const int& data);
    const int& getInt() const;
    PROPERTY(setInt, getInt) myInt;
};

Incidentally, MSVC has its own property. Probably this is easier if it serves the purpose.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, that's a lot nicer than mine. +1. However, you do need PROPERTY(c::setInt, c::getInt) in order for it to be valid C++. – Ben Voigt Jul 4 '11 at 15:51
    
@BenVoigt: Oh, yes, the notation in the answer is applicable only for MSVC. Thank you for pointing out! – Ise Wisteria Jul 4 '11 at 16:30
    
your implementation seems to have some errors. and I can't figure out how to fix them. here is my code ideone.com/nPwZ5 and it's almost an exact copy/paste from here; – Ali.S Jul 4 '11 at 19:40
    
Here they are fixed on gcc: ideone.com/L3tgB On VC++ 2010 it runs into the same bug mine does, or so it would appear. – Ben Voigt Jul 4 '11 at 19:55
    
@Gajet @BenVoigt: I apologise for insufficient confirmation before posting the answer. Actually, I tested on VC2005 with Boost native typeof instead of decltype, and the code could be compiled in that environment. I'm sorry, if this doesn't work on VC2010. – Ise Wisteria Jul 4 '11 at 20:41

Success at last! http://ideone.com/XJ7of

This slightly better version works only on Comeau (not sure whether Comeau or gcc is correct, but gcc complains about the friend designation).

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

template <class T, class X,void (T::type::*setFunc)(const typename X::type&),const typename X::type& (T::type::*getFunc)()const> class property_impl
{ 
    typename T::type* const owner;
    friend typename T::type;
    property_impl(typename T::type* const pOwner) : owner (pOwner)
    {
    }
public:
    property_impl& operator = (const typename X::type& input){(owner->*setFunc)(input); return *this;}
    operator const typename X::type&()const {return (owner->*getFunc)();}
};

template<typename T> struct identity { typedef T type; };

template<typename Arg, typename T>
identity<T> match_memfn_classtype( void (T::*fn)(Arg) );

template<typename Arg, typename T>
identity<Arg> match_memfn_argtype( void (T::*fn)(Arg) );

#define property(setter,getter) property_impl<decltype(match_memfn_classtype(setter)), decltype(match_memfn_argtype(setter)), setter, getter>

struct C
{
private:
    int hiddenData;
protected:
    void setInt(const int& data) { hiddenData = data; std::cout << "setter used\n"; }
    const int& getInt() const { std::cout << "getter used\n"; return hiddenData; }
public:
    C() : myInt(this), hiddenData(5) {}
    property(&C::setInt,&C::getInt) myInt;
};

int main(void)
{
    C c;
    std::cout << "c.myInt = " << c.myInt << '\n';
    c.myInt = -1;
    std::cout << "c.myInt = " << c.myInt << '\n';
    return 0;
}

And VC++ 2010 chokes on all variations, although it does work for very simple use of match_memfn_classtype.

Bug report filed (please upvote):

C++ compiler loses member-ness of pointer-to-member-function during template deduction, causes ICE


Microsoft updated the bug report to say they've figured out a fix.

share|improve this answer
    
it seems to fail on VC2010 express, but any how gave you an upvote! and the code you pasted here is not the one you submited to ideone. above code also fails to run on gcc so fix that! – Ali.S Jul 4 '11 at 19:45
    
@Gajet: It fails because of a bug in gcc, it seems. Eventually that bug will get fixed. In the meantime, you can download the version I put on ideone, which works on gcc. But @Ise's answer is better. – Ben Voigt Jul 4 '11 at 19:50
    
that has some problems both on my vc and on gcc (ideone) and i can't fix it :( – Ali.S Jul 4 '11 at 19:59
    
@Gajet: I fixed it on gcc: ideone.com/L3tgB but looks like it runs into the exact same MSVC bug mine does. – Ben Voigt Jul 4 '11 at 20:00

I'd like to know if we could possibly do anything to extract class type from two function pointers property needs.

Not really. There's no way to know what the class type of a member pointer is, even with metaprogramming type traits.

Oh, and those are member pointers, not function pointers. They're not the same thing.

share|improve this answer
    
I mean something like you declare a function template <class T> swap(T& a, T& b) and the you can use it without specifying T itself. – Ali.S Jul 4 '11 at 10:06
    
@Gajet: That's a function; it can infer the template parameters by the arguments you give it. You're making a class; you don't give a class arguments (you do the constructor, but that can't affect the class's type), so it can't infer anything. – Nicol Bolas Jul 4 '11 at 10:07
    
@Nicol: The class type of a pointer-to-member-function can be inferred, (the general case is probably difficult, the case here is easy). ideone.com/sPaWf However, getting that detected type back to the template argument list would be a cure worse than the disease. – Ben Voigt Jul 4 '11 at 14:46
    
The cure is pretty gnarly, but the final user-facing syntax is reasonably nice. – Ben Voigt Jul 4 '11 at 15:49

If removing template parameters is what you need, then you can do that, but not by removing the first template parameter. What you can do is remove the method pointer template parameters, because those are truly not needed. The code below compiled with gcc with no problems, it's a simplified version of you need but you can see what can be done with it:

template<class T, class X> class Foo {
public:
    typedef const X& (T::*GetterFunc)() const;
    typedef void (T::*SetterFunc)(const X&);
    Foo(T* instance, GetterFunc getter, SetterFunc setter):
        _owner(instance), _getter(getter), _setter(setter) { }

    T* _owner;
    GetterFunc _getter;
    SetterFunc _setter;

};

class FooBar {
};

class Bar {
public:
    Bar(FooBar& foobar):_foobar(foobar) { }
    const FooBar& get() const { return _foobar; }
    void set(const FooBar& foobar) { _foobar = foobar; }
    FooBar _foobar;
};


int main() {
    FooBar foobar;
    Bar bar(foobar);
    Foo<Bar, FooBar> foo(&bar, &Bar::get, &Bar::set);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The member function pointers are what you WANT to be template parameters, because that lets the compiler inline calls. – Ben Voigt Jul 4 '11 at 14:32
    
you got idea problem completely wrong i didn't want setter and getter not to be a part of template parameters, I wanted to eliminate T. – Ali.S Jul 4 '11 at 15:07

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