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I have a list of string that have already been arranged according to a numeric value. Now I would like to group these strings in the following way.

Lets say I have a text file that looks like this:

dbc
eb
cd
edd
acb
ebc
dac
edb
cda

And I would like to order it in a way that would end up like this:

dbc
dac
eb
ebc
edd
edb
cd
cda
acb

So as you can see it has to group by the letter of the string and stack em together.
What would be the most efficient way of accomplishing this task?

UPDATE. As you can see the desired order is not alphabetical, that includes reverse. As I mentioned the objective is to group the strings and order them by first appearance. For this example I am using letter to simplify a (lot) more complex problem I am trying to solve. The thing to concentrate with here is the order on which the letter of each string appear. Grouping in a specific order, rather than ordering.

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1  
Is the order of the strings relevant? Or might they just be alphabetically sorted in which case you'd get the grouping as well? - for example your input has edd, ebc, edb in that order, but your required output would be ebc, edd, edb. How would you get that ordering? It's neither natural (alphabetic) nor the order of input. –  Thomas Jul 4 '11 at 9:47
    
@joel_gil, This appears to be reverse order with a twist. Have you considered using reverse order? –  Peter Lawrey Jul 4 '11 at 9:49
    
Hi guys, for the 'e' letter, the order is: eb, edd, ebc, edb. And desired output (for that letter) is: eb, ebc, edd, edb. The reaosn is that eb appears first, so i want the rest that start with 'eb*' in the order that the appear, since thay have been "weighted" already, i must keep the in that order. is not reverse order, the order is not related to the alphabet but to which appear first. –  joel_gil Jul 4 '11 at 10:00
    
Define your own Comparator and then use Collections.sort() –  Eng.Fouad Jul 4 '11 at 10:03
    
@joel_gil: The question would be much more clear if you just showed us your real problem instead of "simplifying" with letters. –  Christoffer Hammarström Jul 4 '11 at 10:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

OK, this looks complicated. If I understand this right, you need a two-step solution:

  1. You need to map several Strings to a common prefix

    public static String mapKey(String value){
        // or whatever your mapping to a common key would be
        return value.substring(0, 2);
    }
    
  2. You need to sort by this prefix, in order of occurrence

    What I'd suggest for you to use is a Guava Multimap, specifically a LinkedHashMultimap:

    Multimap<String, String> map = LinkedHashMultimap.create();
    // write data to map
    for(String word: yourData){
        map.put(mapKey(word), word);
    }
    // read items from map, grouped by prefix
    for (String value : map.values()) {
        System.out.println(value);
    }
    

    Explanation: LinkedHashMultimap iterates over its entries in the order that its keys were created. Since you have multiple entries with common keys (as defined by mapKey), they will be returned as group.

Actually, on re-reading your requirements, LinkedHashMultimap won't quite fit, either (because the items of the individual groups will come out at random). You'll need a custom Multimap:

Multimap<String,String> map = Multimaps.newListMultimap(
        new LinkedHashMap<String, Collection<String>>(),
        (Supplier<? extends List<String>>) new Supplier<List<String>>() {
    public List<String> get() {
        return new ArrayList<String>();
    }
});

(The rest of the code remains unchanged)

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interesting, will try to implement it and get back with the results. –  joel_gil Jul 4 '11 at 11:45
    
@joel yes, but see the update I just added –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jul 4 '11 at 11:46

What you need is a prefix tree (trie). This is a tree where each level corresponds to a position in the string (root = 0, level 1 = first letter, etc.) and each node corresponds to a letter. The node also contains a boolean (say isWord), specifying whether there is a word ending there or not and in your case you need another int say index, to specify the index of the word in your initial ordering (in case isWord == true).

You might also use a Set that originally contain all the words.

Now just start iterating through the original list and for every word that is not taken do the following:

  1. Find it in the trie, add it to the new list, mark it as taken.
  2. Take all the words in its subtree, which are not taken (i.e. all of those that start with the same prefix), order them by index and mark them as taken add them to the new list.
  3. Move up one level to the parent of your current node and do the same until you reach the root.

Hope that helps.

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while I would also suggest this, this would not yield the strange sorting the OP seems to want –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jul 4 '11 at 9:51
    
what is his sorting - I thought it was that... –  Petar Ivanov Jul 4 '11 at 9:52
    
at this point I am also trying to figure that out :-), but it's certainly not an alphabetical sorting –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jul 4 '11 at 9:54
    
Hi guys, Sean is correct, the sorting is not alphabetical. As mentioned, the strings have be already order by a numeric value. I am using letter to represent the relation of the value for each of them. In other words, the sorting is dependent of the order the appear. Is more of a grouping defined by string matching, but not alphabetical (is that makes sense). –  joel_gil Jul 4 '11 at 10:02
    
no it doesn't, actually –  Petar Ivanov Jul 4 '11 at 10:03

A trie that maintains insertion order, for example using LinkedHashMap, does the trick.

I hacked together a simple trie like this:

import org.junit.Test;

import java.util.*;

import static java.util.Arrays.asList;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;

public class LinkedTrieTest {

    @Test
    public void testLinkedTrie() {

        List<String> input = asList(
                "dbc",
                "eb",
                "cd",
                "edd",
                "acb",
                "ebc",
                "dac",
                "edb",
                "cda"
        );

        List<String> expected = asList(
                "dbc",
                "dac",
                "eb",
                "ebc",
                "edd",
                "edb",
                "cd",
                "cda",
                "acb"
        );

        assertEquals(expected, iterableToList(new LinkedTrie(input)));
    }

    private List<String> iterableToList(Iterable<String> t) {
        List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();
        for (String s : t) {
            result.add(s);
        }
        return result;
    }

    private class LinkedTrie implements Iterable<String> {

        private Node root = new Node();

        private LinkedTrie() {
        }

        private LinkedTrie(Iterable<String> strings) {
            addAll(strings);
        }

        private void addAll(Iterable<String> strings) {
            for (String string : strings) {
                add(string);
            }
        }

        public void add(String s) {
            root.add(s);
        }

        @Override
        public Iterator<String> iterator() {
            return root.iterator();
        }

        private class Node {
            private Map<Character, Node> nodes = new LinkedHashMap<Character, Node>();

            private void add(String s) {
                if (s.isEmpty()) {
                    nodes.put(null,null);
                    return;
                }
                Character c = s.charAt(0);
                Node node = nodes.get(c);
                if (null == node) {
                    node = new Node();
                }
                nodes.put(c, node);
                node.add(s.substring(1));
            }

            private Iterator<String> iterator() {
                return new TrieIterator();
            }

            private class TrieIterator implements Iterator<String> {

                private Iterator<Map.Entry<Character,Node>> prefixesWithSuffixes = nodes.entrySet().iterator();
                private Character currentPrefix;
                private Iterator<String> suffixesForCurrentPrefix = Collections.<String>emptyList().iterator();

                @Override
                public boolean hasNext() {
                    return suffixesForCurrentPrefix.hasNext() || prefixesWithSuffixes.hasNext();
                }

                @Override
                public String next() {
                    if (outOfSuffixesForCurrentPrefix()) {
                        if (outOfPrefixes()) {
                            throw new NoSuchElementException();
                        }
                        Map.Entry<Character, Node> prefixWithSuffixes = prefixesWithSuffixes.next();
                        currentPrefix = prefixWithSuffixes.getKey();
                        if (null == currentPrefix) {
                            return "";
                        }
                        suffixesForCurrentPrefix = prefixWithSuffixes.getValue().iterator();
                    }
                    return currentPrefix + suffixesForCurrentPrefix.next();
                }

                private boolean outOfPrefixes() {
                    return !prefixesWithSuffixes.hasNext();
                }

                private boolean outOfSuffixesForCurrentPrefix() {
                    return !suffixesForCurrentPrefix.hasNext();
                }

                @Override
                public void remove() {
                    throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
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public static List<String> crazySort(List<String> list) {
  LinkedHashMap<Character, List<String>> map = 
    new LinkedHashMap<Character, List<String>>();
  for (String s : list) {
    List<String> group = map.get(s.charAt(0));
    if (group == null)
      map.put(s.charAt(0), new ArrayList<String>());
    group.add(s);
  }
  List<String> sorted = new ArrayList<String>(list.size());
  for (List<String> group : map.values()) {
    sorted.addAll(group);
  }
  return sorted;
}
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