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This question is related to the one here: configurable dependencies with easy to mock out default implementations.

My goal is to design small library, following DI pattern. Having code like the following is this right usage of DI?

ValuesConfiguration is just wrapper for Map. It is kind of Value Object, it is created by client in runtime, so there is no possibility to use dependency injection. Previous version (in related question) had this configuration as a constructor argument, but it seemed not to be "real" dependency.

public class Parser {

    private ValuesConfiguration configuration;
    private ValuesProvider valuesProvider;
    private ValuesMapper valuesMapper;

    public Parser() {}

    public Result parse(String parameterName) {
        initDefaults();           
        List<Values> values = valuesProvider.getValues(parameterName);
        ...
        return valuesMapper.transformValues(values, configuration);
    }

    private void initDefaults() {
        if(valuesProvider == null) {
            valuesProvider = DefaultsFactory.getDefaultValuesProvider();
        }
    }

    public void setConfiguration(ValuesConfiguration configuration) {
        this.valuesConfiguration = configuration;
    }

    public void setValuesProvider(ValuesProvider provider) {
        this.valuesProvider = provider;
    }

    ...

}

Isn't it better to put configuration as a parse() method additional parameter?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

An alternative to Dependency Injection is for a component to discover its own dependencies. It appears to me that you have used the later model.

If you had used dependency injection you would only pass the values its needed and no more. i.e. all its dependencies are injected not extracted. The component wouldn't need to know where the values came from.

A big hint is that your constructor takes no values and your setters are passed generic objects which are not needed once the component has been properly initialised.

How you could change it to use DI.

public class Parser {

    private final ValuesProvider valuesProvider;
    private final ValuesMapper valuesMapper;
    private final ValuesConfiguration configuratrion;

    // all values injected.
    public Parser(ValuesProvider valuesProvider, ValuesMapper valuesMapper, ValuesConfiguration configuratrion) {
        this.valuesProvider = valuesProvider;
        this.valuesMapper = valuesMapper;
        this.configuratrion = configuratrion;
    }

    public Result parse(String parameterName) {
        List<Values> values = valuesProvider.getValues(parameterName);
        ...
        return valuesMapper.transformValues(values, configuration);
    }
 }
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In your code there is no place for default implementations. Both provider and mapper must be set via constructor. Moreover, as I mentioned ValuesConfiguration is created and populated in runtime, so I wouldn't put it in constructor as a dependency. –  grafthez Jul 4 '11 at 12:50
    
The component doesn't need to know there is a default implementation. If the caller want the default implementation to be used it would pass it. When you have a ValuesConfiguration, you can create a Parser. Does it make sense to have a Parser without a configuration? –  Peter Lawrey Jul 4 '11 at 13:15
    
Right, Parser with null configuration is useless :) But say client would like to use this library's classes as e.g. Spring beans (Parser, ValuesProvider, etc). It gets impossible while configuration (being runtime parameter) is being set via constructor. Am I right? –  grafthez Jul 4 '11 at 14:07
    
Spring supports dependency injection. Is there any reason Spring doesn't know how to get the ValuesConfiguration? –  Peter Lawrey Jul 4 '11 at 15:04
1  
A user cannot create a ValuesConfiguration, only the program can do that. The user can input values which the program can input into a Map. You can pass an "empty" ValueConfiguration which is updated later based on user input. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 5 '11 at 5:41

I wouldn't combine Factories with DI. It's just confusing. For example, here we're using dependency injection:

public void setValuesProvider(ValuesProvider provider) {
    this.valuesProvider = provider;
}

But oh wait, here we're using a factory:

private void initDefaults() {
    if(valuesProvider == null) {
        valuesProvider = DefaultsFactory.getDefaultValuesProvider();
    }
}

Maybe I'm just slower than most, but to me that looks schizophrenic. If you want to use DI, use DI. Either set up a specific (named) default provider and invoke it like so:

setValuesProvider(myDefaultProvider)

Note that in this case, you'll have to carefully document it. Or another way would be to just use some clever inheritance (or maybe via statics?) to be able to revert ANY ValuesProvider to its default state:

setValuesProvider(myProvider.defaultState())

The latter makes the most sense to me. The idea here needs to be that whenever you want to play with a Parser, a ValuesProvider MUST be provided. Thus, I would most likely use DI through the Parser() constructor.

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You're right, now I see the mix DI/factory is kind of smell. –  grafthez Jul 4 '11 at 12:55

DI isn't always appropriate. Using a DI factory does not preclude calling new in all cases. Yours would appear to be one of those.

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I like to follow this approach with defaults:

public Parser(ValuesMapper valuesMapper, ValuesConfiguration configuratrion) {
    this(DefaultsFactory.getDefaultValuesProvider(), valuesMapper, configuratrion);
}

// all values injected.
public Parser(ValuesProvider valuesProvider, ValuesMapper valuesMapper, ValuesConfiguration configuratrion) {
    this.valuesProvider = valuesProvider;
    this.valuesMapper = valuesMapper;
    this.configuratrion = configuratrion;
}
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