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I'd like to run my ASP.Net application in a custom AppDomain, that i would create programmatically. The requests must be executed within that custom AppDomain, and not the default one.

Why would someone do that ?

The need is to customize the AppDomain settings depending on the environment. Let's say the application is running on a dev machine, on a production server, in the cloud or whatever, I need to 'intercept' the first call to create the running AppDomain as needed. And I really need to do that programmatically : I don't want to perform configuration on the running plateform, the code have to be smart enought to adapt itself.

How I can detect the environment and what customization are needed is not the point here.

Thanks for your ideas !

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Done. I didn't know accept-rate was so important. I believed stackoverflow was about quality answer, not about scoring. – Mose Jul 4 '11 at 10:35

I don't know if you can have the pages and requests/responses of your ASP.NET application running on a different appDomain than the one provided to you by IIS.

In IIS you can configure each application to run in a different AppPool but then you have to live with that.

there is not much on the Net about your specific request, I found this one: http://odetocode.com/Articles/305.aspx but it's only an introduction.

Can't you have a backend where you configure the business logic components to serve your requests depending on the custom configuration you want to use regardless the web application app domain?

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Thanks for your answer. I couldn't find anything relevant for what I want to do. Having a back-end is not possible for many reasons (I tried to explain it but it's long and uninteresting ^^) - Let me give you an example of what I need : we work work with LOT of legacy code that deals with web.config, and now we want to use a different web.config depending on the environment. I don't want a post-build step or any trick on the file, I just want to define the config file at runtime in the AppDomain (this an example of the needs). – Mose Jul 4 '11 at 12:56
    
can't you have a setup per prod and a separated setup per dev in different applications in IIS responding to different URLS? this would be the way, myApp or myAppDev or myAppQA depending on the env. – Davide Piras Jul 4 '11 at 13:14
    
1) configuration is not the only issue. 2) I want the same application to be deployable on a IIS, on the cloud or to be run locally without having to think about configuration. And I don't need ways to get around my need, but a solution to my need, if any. I'm a developer and I need to focus on my job : coding. Having all 3 configurations in the project means efficiency when debugging. Not having to configurate IIS means I can focus on my job : developing. We are a small company and we are looking for efficiency. – Mose Jul 4 '11 at 15:40

Well, it all depends on the level of luxury you need. You can do that: make a small configuration readers who will abstract the loading of settings, and make a kind of "Env installer" - who will add roles and instances to cloud, or create IIS sites with System.Web.Administration classes, or in any other way. But the funny thing with that is the simple fact - you will need to configure anything you will create anyway. For example, if you creating a site that uses Azure data tables, you need to pass somehow a connection string to that or at least the management certificate and a description in code JSON or xml waht exactly you want ot get as result of "automatic configuration"....

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