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I'm trying to write a method in java that will increment a counter for each time one of the following rules is satisfied when iterating through an array.

1) Two adjacent values in an array equal each other and the first value in each pair starts at an even numbered index value (0,2,4...etc)

2) For all adjacent pairs of entries, the values of one pair equal the values of the next pair and length(adjacent pairs of entries) mod 2 = 0 So 0,0,0,0,1,1 satisfies this rule but 0,0,0,1 does not (there are only 3 0's which violates the last condition)

So far I have this, which implements the first rule:

public class ArrayEvaluate {

public static double evaluate(int[] array)
{
    double  ruleSat = 0;
      for(int index = 0; index < array.length; index++){

            if((array[index] == array[index + 1]) &&(index%2==0)){
                ruleSat++;
            }
}
return ruleSat;
}
 public static void main(final String[] args){

int[] array = new int[6];
array[0]= 1;
array[1]=1;
array[2]=3;
array[3]=3;
array[4]=4;
array[5]=4;

evaluate(array);
 }
}

However, this does not work completely, and I'm not sure how to go about the second rule.

Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
Define "does not work completely". What, precisely, does not work? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 4 '11 at 10:14
    
Please explain the Input and Output. I am unable to get the complete image where are you stuck. –  Talha Ahmed Khan Jul 4 '11 at 10:15
1  
I bet he gets an index out of bounds on the last iteration because of: 'if((array[index] == array[index + 1])' –  Kevin Bowersox Jul 4 '11 at 10:17
3  
the second rule is totally unclear... –  Petar Ivanov Jul 4 '11 at 10:19
1  
@Bubble, This sounds like homework. Did they give you example in class of how to look at every second entry and how to declare an array or a counter? –  Peter Lawrey Jul 4 '11 at 10:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
public static double evaluate(int[] array) {
    double ruleSat = 0;
    for (int index = 0; index < array.length; index++) {
        if (index != array.length-1) {
            if ((array[index] == array[index + 1]) && (index % 2 == 0)) {
                ruleSat++;
            }
        }
    }
    return ruleSat;
}

This will prevent the index out of bounds error your receiving

Update for second rule: This separates the logic for rule 1 and rule 2 so if you ever need to change a rule individually they are independent.

public class ArrayEvaluate {

public static double evaluate(int[] array) {
    double something = 0;
    int rule1Occurences = testRule1(array);
    int rule2Occurences = testRule2(array);
    System.out.println(rule1Occurences);
    System.out.println(rule2Occurences);
    return something;//not sure how rules relate
}
//This counts when array element == next array element
public static int testRule1(int[] array){
    int ruleSat = 0;
    for (int index = 0; index < array.length; index++) {
        if (index != array.length - 1) {
            if ((array[index] == array[index + 1]) && (index % 2 == 0)) {
                ruleSat++;
            }
        }
    }
    return ruleSat;     
}
//This blocks the pairs off in sets of two disregarding any odd parings
public static int testRule2(int[] array)
{
    int rule2Sat = 0;
    for (int index = 0; index < array.length; index++) {
        if(index <= array.length - 4){
            if (array[index] + array[index+1] == array[index+2] + array[index+3]) {
                rule2Sat++;
            }
        }
    }
    return rule2Sat;    
}

public static void main(final String[] args) {

    int[] dataSet = new int[6];
    dataSet[0] = 0;
    dataSet[1] = 0;
    dataSet[2] = 0;
    dataSet[3] = 0;
    dataSet[4] = 4;
    dataSet[5] = 4;

    System.out.println(evaluate(dataSet));
}

}

share|improve this answer
    
Cool thanks, do you have any ideas for the second rule? –  Bubble Jul 4 '11 at 10:34
    
@Bubble, checkout my crack at the second rule, i have updated my post –  Kevin Bowersox Jul 4 '11 at 10:38
    
@Bubble, wouldn't 0,0,0,1 be valid for the second rule because the pair [0,0],0,1 matches 0[0,0],1? Can one number be part of both pairs? Let me know because this has code implications –  Kevin Bowersox Jul 4 '11 at 10:47
    
I've forgot to add there has to be more than 2 entries, so it would not be valid in that case. What do you mean one number being part of both pairs? –  Bubble Jul 4 '11 at 10:55
    
Well if I have four numbers 1 2 3 4, there are actually three pairs, [1 2] [2 3] [3 4], unless by adjacent you mean you are only considering them in sequential blocks of two, which would mean only two pairs [1 2] [3 4]. Does that make sense? This has implications in the second rule –  Kevin Bowersox Jul 4 '11 at 10:58

Since you say its not homework, this is what I would do

public class ArrayEvaluate {
    public static int evaluate(int... array) {
        int counter = 0;
        for(int i = 0; i < array.length-1; i += 2)
            if(array[i] == array[i + 1]) { // rule one
               counter++; 
               if (i < array.length-3 && 
                     array[i] == array[i + 2] && 
                     array[i + 2] == array[i + 3]) // rule two
                  counter++;
            }
        return counter;
    }


  public static void main(String... args){
    int test1 = evaluate(1,2,3,3,4,4);
    assert test1 == 2;
    int test2 = evaluate(0,0,0,0,1,1);
    assert test1 == 4;
    int test2 = evaluate(0,0,0,1,1,1);
    assert test1 == 2;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
For test1 the assert test1 should equal 2 because only 3,3 and 4,4 are satisfied and in the last test, it should also be 2 because only the 0,0 at the beginnig and the 1,1 at the end are satisfied –  Bubble Jul 4 '11 at 10:59
    
Also the second rule should match entries of any even size >2 not just 4 –  Bubble Jul 4 '11 at 11:09
    
If its an even size greater than 4 you only need to check the first 4. It would only make a difference if you wanted one pair to mean +1, two pair means +3 (2 pair and one quadruple), three pair means +6 (three pair, two quadruple and one lot of six) four pair means +10, etc. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 4 '11 at 13:13

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