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I have a method in C# that I want to run from multiple threads for lets say 20 times in a console app, on a 4 core machine. The problem I am facing is that the results are not what I expect them to be. When I run the method 25 times sequentially, the time taken is X and I can see in perfmon that max CPU is 100% (it tells me that it is using 1 core). Running the same method using multiple threads, I expect the execution time to be X/4 and also I expect the max CPU usage in perfmon to be 400% (since it is a 4 core machine). However, I can only see that the execution time is X/2 and the max CPU usage has never been more than 275%. I have tried various things such as creating my own threads, using threasdpool etc. and nothing seems to work. Can somebody please explain/help me understand it better?

Other interesting thing is that if I replace my method with a dummy task using Thread.SpinWait(x) the execution time is X/4 and I can see max CPU going to 400%. This tells me that something is wrong in my method and I don't understand what it is. I have no locks/sleep anywhere in my method. Following is the code I use to execute:

public static void DoWorkParallel()
{
    var s = new List<string> { "a", "b", "c", "d", "e", etc. };
    s.ParallelForEach2(x =>
                       {
                           MyTask(x);
                       });
}

public static void DoWorkSequential()
{
    var s = new List<string> { "a", "b", "c", "d", "e", etc. };
    foreach (var ss in s)
    {
        MyTask(x);
    }       
}

public static void ParallelForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, Action<T> action)
{
    var results = collection.Skip(1).Select(item => new 
    {
        action,
        res = action.BeginInvoke(item, null, null)
    }).ToArray();

    action(collection.First()); /* let the mainthread do a job too*/

    foreach (var r in results)
    {
        r.action.EndInvoke(r.res); /*then wait the rest of time */
    }
}
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Given that you fail to provide a definition for ParallelForEach2, this is going to be a tricky one. –  spender Jul 4 '11 at 10:46
    
Sorry, my mistake.. Please read it as s.ParallelForEach(.... –  Kumar Jul 4 '11 at 10:47
    
What does MyTask() do? CPU usage going up if you replace it with a SpinWait indicates that MyTask() is not (exclusively) CPU bound, requires access to shared resources, or that the work is performed quicker than the wait time in your dummy task. –  Thomas Gerstendörfer Jul 4 '11 at 11:28
    
Basically MyTask() goes and looks up into memory and does some calculations and allocates more memory if it needs to. Running the task sequentially does always show 100% CPU usage which I think suggests that the task is CPU intensive. The memory as far as I know is not shared between any instances of the objects being used in these threads. –  Kumar Jul 4 '11 at 11:44
    
Really four cores, or two cores with hyperthreading? –  Jeremy McGee Jul 4 '11 at 11:50

2 Answers 2

Thread.SpinWait is running in a tight loop, performing no I/O and accessing no memory -- it's doing no useful work, so comparing its CPU usage to that of your task is a fallacy.

Without details of what your task is doing (whether it accesses files, waits on mutexes, etc.), it's difficult to determine what's going on.

One thing you can do is to add a Stopwatch instance to your task, and use it to print the time elapsed for each invocation. Compare the results of running tasks with DoWorkSequential and ParallelForEach -- each invocation should take the same amount of time regardless of the method. If the tasks run by ParallelForEach are taking longer, it could indicate you have, say, a mutex that is in contention and needs to be replaced with another locking method.

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The MyTask does some CPU intensive work. It goes into the memory and looks at some cached objects and does some calculations and creation of more memory etc. Looking at the perfmon suggests that there are no I/O operations. Also there is no shared memory being used by the threads (Again, perfmon says that there are no contentions). I will try adding the stopwatch() and see whats going on. –  Kumar Jul 4 '11 at 11:51
    
If you call new anywhere in MyTask (or operate on a class or container that calls new), the subsequent allocation of memory might trigger a garbage collection. If many objects are successively created and thrown away during your task, the GC cost may be adding up and start slowing you down. –  Blair Holloway Jul 4 '11 at 12:03

You may want to set the MaxDegreeOfParallelism to 4 in a ParallelOptions parameter to your Parallel.Foreach invocation. If you don't, dotnet4 uses a lot of worker threads; their management and synchronization overhead can be a little wasteful. I had a similar problem and this worked for me.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.tasks.paralleloptions.aspx

Also, keep things simple here. Remember that when you use tightly-wrought parallelism, you're trading off records per second (cpu core throughput) against records per quarter (programmer productivity).

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