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I have two numpy arrays: a and b. I want to select all of the indices where a == 1 and b == 0.

That is, if I have the following arrays:

a = [0, 1, 3, 5, 1, 1, 2]

b = [1, 0, 2, 5, 3, 0, 6]

I would like to get the following indices back:

[1, 5]

How should I do this in numpy? I have tried using the following (suggested by a quick reference guide showing differences between numpy, matlab and IDL):

(a == 1 and b == 0).nonzero()

But that gives an error about truth values being ambiguous.

Any ideas?

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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
In []: a= array([0, 1, 3, 5, 1, 1, 2])
In []: b= array([1, 0, 2, 5, 3, 0, 6])
In []: logical_and(a== 1, b== 0).nonzero()[0]
Out[]: array([1, 5])

Obviously this will work as well:

In []: ((a== 1)& (b== 0)).nonzero()[0]
Out[]: array([1, 5])
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Here's one way:

In [75]: import numpy as np

In [76]: a = np.array([0, 1, 3, 5, 1, 1, 2])

In [77]: b = np.array([1, 0, 2, 5, 3, 0, 6])

In [78]: np.argwhere((a==1) & (b==0)).flatten()
Out[78]: array([1, 5])
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where could be used here to replace the two-step argwhere(...).flatten() –  Paul Jul 4 '11 at 12:37
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Try to use the following code:

import numpy

a = numpy.array([0, 1, 3, 5, 1, 1, 2])
b = numpy.array([1, 0, 2, 5, 3, 0, 6])

res =  [i for i,v in enumerate(zip(a,b)) if v == (1,0)]

print res
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Was what I was in the process of posting :) Nice and concise. –  Tom Christie Jul 4 '11 at 11:03
    
@tomc - thank you –  Artsiom Rudzenka Jul 4 '11 at 11:06
    
Erm, why'd it get downvoted? True, it's not numpy specific, but it is the most pythonic answer. –  Tom Christie Jul 4 '11 at 11:32
    
Actually it is always nice to know - what is wrong with code - i mean say me what i am doing wrong - so i will have a chance to not make this error again in the future. –  Artsiom Rudzenka Jul 4 '11 at 11:37
1  
@Artsiom Rudzenka: I didn't down vote. FWIW, there is no error per se, and IMHO your solution is very valid when handling pure python lists. However numpy arrays won't perform very well with this kind of approach. The paradigm is just different. Also, personally, my eyes get hurt when I'm forced to read really needles looping, even it's hidden in list comprehension. IMHO, abstraction levels don't really match with your solution. My 2 cents. Thanks –  eat Jul 4 '11 at 16:53
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I'm not an expert with numpy errors, but this is what I would do with regular python lists, and perhaps you could use it here, too:

>>> a = [0, 1, 3, 5, 1, 1, 2]
>>> b = [1, 0, 2, 5, 3, 0, 6]
>>> zip(a, b)
[(0, 1), (1, 0), (3, 2), (5, 5), (1, 3), (1, 0), (2, 6)]
>>> for i, tup in enumerate(zip(a, b)):
...     if tup[0]==1 and tup[1]==0:
...         print i
...
1
5
>>>

Hope this helps

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