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Say I have a generic method in C# that accepts two values of type T:

public void M<T>(T a, T b)
{
    ...
}

Inside body of M() I wish to compare both input values for equality. Since I don't know anything about their run-time types except that they are the same type, I could do this using the object.Equals() static method and let it choose the best way:

public void M<T>(T a, T b)
{
    if (object.Equals(a, b))
    {
        ...
    }
    else
    {
        ...
    }
}

The problem I see here is needless boxing of the two values when T isn't a reference type. I would like to avoid that penalty, because M() is called very frequently.

My question is: is there a better way to go about this? I'm obviously interested in a solution that wouldn't involve too much analysis of T up front, which would offset gains from boxing evasion.

TIA.

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1  
possible duplicate of c# compare two generic values –  Ed S. Jul 4 '11 at 11:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted
if(EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(a,b))
{...}

this uses IEquatable<T> when available to avoid boxing, and handles value-types, reference-types, and "lifted" usage against Nullable<T> to avoid boxing in almost all scenarios.

When IEquatable<T> is not available, it must defer to object.Equals, so boxing of value-types may occur.

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Perfect! I knew about this class, but wasn't really able to connect the dots since I rarely use it in my own code. Thanks, Marc! –  aoven Jul 4 '11 at 11:07
    
I think I just found boxing still happens with IEquatable<> valuetypes on mono (trunk); I added a comment to JbEvain's latest commit there to ask his opinion (I only spent a few minutes looking at monodis output here) –  sehe Jul 4 '11 at 12:30
    
I would expect that running EqualityComparer<T>.Default once is usually going to take longer than using instance.Compare once, even in cases where the latter would require boxing. The advantage of using EqualityComparer<T>.Default comes if one can use it once and then use the returned method on hundreds or thousands of value-type instances. Note that only value types and sealed class types should implement IEquatable<T>; if I had my druthers, EqualityComparer<T>.Default would check for implementation of IDontUseEquatable and, for any class implementing it, use Object.Equals. –  supercat Sep 1 '11 at 20:07
    
@supercat the strategy per T is cached in a field, so once it has been used once, all subsequent uses of .Default are pretty quick. It doesn't have to do any thinking - just a deference... but yes, capturing the return value into a variable is even better. –  Marc Gravell Sep 1 '11 at 20:11
    
@Marc Gravell: Thanks for the info. BTW, do you agree that inheritable types shouldn't implement IEquatable<T>? –  supercat Sep 1 '11 at 20:54

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