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I have the following XML in a string:

<RootElement>
    <Data>
        <Row>
            <Id>1</Id>
            <Name>Foo</Name>
        </Row>
        <Row>
            <Id>2</Id>
            <Name>Bar</Name>
        </Row>
    </Data>
</RootElement>

And the following class:

public class BusinessObject
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

How can i parse all the data in the Row elements to an IList using XPath?

I need to learn this for training.

Thanks for your answers.

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XPath without LINQ –  Răzvan Panda Jul 4 '11 at 11:34
    
Limited to .NET 3.5 –  Răzvan Panda Jul 4 '11 at 11:45
    
Cause it's for training purposes. I know LINQ is easyer but i have to learn XPath without any LINQ. –  Răzvan Panda Jul 4 '11 at 11:52
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
IEnumerable<BusinessObject> ParseWithXPath(string xml)
{
    XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();
    doc.LoadXml(xml);
    foreach (XmlNode node in doc.DocumentElement.SelectNodes("Data/Row")) // XPath query
    {
        yield return new BusinessObject
        {
            Id = Int32.Parse(node.SelectSingleNode("Id").InnerText),
            Name = node.SelectSingleNode("Name").InnerText
        };
    }
}

Usage:

IEnumerable<BusinessObject> seq = ParseWithXPath(xml); // .NET 2.0+

IList<BusinessObject> list = new List<BusinessObject>(seq); // .NET 2.0+
share|improve this answer
    
@Freeman: Try now. Work for me. –  abatishchev Jul 4 '11 at 12:06
    
Now it compiles but it doesn't return anything. I am not familliar with how yield works. Does the collection need any instantiation? –  Răzvan Panda Jul 4 '11 at 12:23
    
@Freeman: That's the native IEnumerable<T> return. It returns something; otherwise - empty sequence. I tested on XML you posted, and the code returned 2 objects. pastebin.com/BzsgAX2K –  abatishchev Jul 4 '11 at 12:29
    
It worked. Thanks! I had a different more complex XML on which i was testing and made some mistakes. –  Răzvan Panda Jul 4 '11 at 12:47
    
@Freeman: Glad it helped! :) –  abatishchev Jul 4 '11 at 12:54
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I see you've already found a rather clean solution while I was coding an example for you.

Perhaps this helps you a bit more:

internal static class XMLToListWithXPathExample
{
    static XmlDocument xmlDocument;
    static List<BusinessObject> listBusinessObjects;
    static string sXpathStatement = "/Data/Row";

    static void LoadXMLData(string p_sXMLDocumentPath)
    {   
        xmlDocument = new XmlDocument(); // setup the XmlDocument
        xmlDocument.Load(p_sXMLDocumentPath); // load the Xml data
    }

    static void XMLDocumentToList()
    {
        listBusinessObjects = new List<BusinessObject>(); // setup the list
        foreach (XmlNode xmlNode in xmlDocument.SelectNodes(sXpathStatement)) // loop through each node
        {
            listBusinessObjects.Add( // and add it to the list
                new BusinessObject(
                    int.Parse(xmlNode.SelectSingleNode("Id").InnerText), // select the Id node
                    xmlNode.SelectSingleNode("Name").InnerText)); // select the Name node
        }

    }
}

public class BusinessObject
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    // constructor
    public BusinessObject(int p_iID, string p_sName)
    {
        Id = p_iID;
        Name = p_sName;
    }

}

Regards, Nico

share|improve this answer
    
After adding ".DocumentElement" to "xmlDocument.DocumentElement.SelectNodes" and modifying sXpathStatement to "Data/Row" it runs and returns corectly the data. I like your solution more cause it doesn't require yield return (done quite some reasearch on it lately) but i chose abatishchev answer as correct cause it doesn't need modification to BusinessClass. Thanks for your reply and +1 for your time –  Răzvan Panda Jul 5 '11 at 14:43
    
You're most welcome, thanks for the up! –  Nico Beemster Jul 5 '11 at 16:09
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IEnumerable<BusinessObject> busObjects = from item in doc.Descendants("Row")
                                         select new BusinessObject((int)item.Element("Id"), (string)item.Element("Name"));

You could try something like the above. Your BusinessObject Constructor should take the two parameters. BusinessObject(int id, string name)

Please take a look at the following link for example on Linq to XML.

share|improve this answer
    
That's LINQ to XML, not XPath –  abatishchev Jul 4 '11 at 11:30
    
@abatishchev, that do be true. –  Jethro Jul 4 '11 at 11:32
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