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If I have a parent class like this:

class Parent {
protected:
   virtual void foo(type1 var1, type2 var2);
}

and a child class:

class Child : public Parent {
   foo(type1 var1, type2 var2);
}

but what if the foo function in Child doesn't need var1 and var2? Is there a way to tell the compiler not either not give memory to these variables because they're not being used? Or, how do you overload it? Combining overloading and polymorphism though.. how do you do that (if you can/would!).

Thank you.

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2  
With the kind of requirement you are giving, seems that you don't need polymorphism! –  mukeshkumar Jul 4 '11 at 12:21
1  
Assign default values and don't care whether the compiler will pass arguments. Don't think about "overloading" the function in the derived class, see: hiding members –  Damon Jul 4 '11 at 12:21
2  
But default parameters with polymorphism can lead to confusion! See stackoverflow.com/questions/6464404/… –  juanchopanza Jul 4 '11 at 12:25
    
You are not using polymorphism, because you didn't declare the parent method virtual. Note, that protected is the least useful access specifier for virtual method. Either you will be calling it directly from outside, in which it should be public, or you will have a public wrapper for it, in which case private is sufficient. You only need protected if the subclasses will need to call the parent implementations. –  Jan Hudec Jul 4 '11 at 12:40
    
@Jan: Sorry, forgot to add the virtual keyword.. In my application I am but it seemed silly to paste all my code on here! I agree with your suggestions though, thank you. –  ale Jul 4 '11 at 12:43
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2 Answers 2

If the child's function signature is different to the partent's, then the child has two functions which are overloaded.

The compiler will pick the right one according to which kind of arguments you give it. One can modify its arguments and forward the work to another function if it likes.

For example,

class Child : public Parent {
   using Parent :: foo;
   void foo (type1 var1);
};

Child c;
child .foo (type1()); // Valid
child .foo (type1(), type2()); // Valid, calls Parent::foo

void Child :: foo (type1 x) {
    Parent :: foo (x+1, blah);
}

Or, if you want to disambiguate.

class Child : public Parent {
   void foo (type1 var1, type2 var2);
};

Child c;
child .foo (type1(), type2()); // Valid, calls Child::foo
child .Parent :: foo (type1(), type2()); // Valid.

Overriding is something else.

class Parent {
    virtual void foo () {}
};

class Child1 : parent {
    void foo ();
};

class Child2 : parent {
    void foo ();
};

void call_foo (Parent & p) {p .foo ();}

Parent p;
Child1 c1;
Child2 c2;
call_foo (p); // Calls Parent::foo
foo (c1);     // Calls Child1::foo
foo (c2);     // Calls Child1::foo
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2  
Wrong! If the child has function of the same name as parent, than the parent function is hidden and compiler will never consider it for calls through objects of the static type of child (unless qualified with parent name, of course). –  Jan Hudec Jul 4 '11 at 12:35
1  
Good catch, i missed the using. Thanks, correction made. –  spraff Jul 4 '11 at 12:39
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You simply have to define another foo function in Child class with different signature (i.e. different argument). This is overloading function foo. The compiler will execute the correct function according to the parameters you put.

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