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EDIT: Note! This turned out to be a typo in my code

According to msdn , Path.Data appears to be bindable. But I am not sure how to read the Depenedency Property Information part of the msdn page. Is AffectsRender and AffectsMeasure be enough for my use?

If I use x:Name to directly assign it, the geometry appears

var curve = new GeometryGroup();
curve.Children.Add(new LineGeometry(new Point(0, 0), new Point(20, 20)));
curve.Children.Add(new LineGeometry(new Point(0, 20), new Point(20, 0)));
CurveGraph.Data = curve;

This works fine. Draws a nice "X".

However, if I have a dependency property of type GeometryGroup in the ViewModel

var curve = new GeometryGroup();
curve.Children.Add(new LineGeometry(new Point(0, 0), new Point(20, 20)));
curve.Children.Add(new LineGeometry(new Point(0, 20), new Point(20, 0)));
GeometryData= curve;

dp :

public GeometryGroup GeometryData
    {
        get { return (GeometryGroup)GetValue(GeometryDataProperty); }
        set { SetValue(GeometryDataProperty, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty GeometryDataProperty =  DependencyProperty.Register("GeometryDataProperty", typeof(GeometryGroup), typeof(MiniTrendVm), new UIPropertyMetadata(new GeometryGroup()));

...then it didn't work. Nothing happens. No "X".

xaml :

<Path Data="{Binding GeometryData}" x:Name="CurveGraph" Stroke = "{Binding StrokeColor}" StrokeThickness = "2" Grid.RowSpan="4"/> 

Should this work? Have I fat fingered something? Or can't the Data property be set this way? The brush was databound in both cases, so I know that the datacontext is correctly set.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your DependencyProperty is registered as "GeometryDataProperty" which should be "GeometryData". Not quite sure if this actually breaks the binding. Edit: Recent tests by H.B. reveal that this probably is indeed the cause. Binding that property is possible.

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Why are you talking about yourself in the 3rd person? –  svick Jul 4 '11 at 15:39
    
@svick: Just for the heck of it :) –  H.B. Jul 4 '11 at 15:40
    
recent tests by svick seem to indicate this can confuse some people :-) –  svick Jul 4 '11 at 15:44
    
OMG! Thank you! –  Tormod Jul 4 '11 at 15:45
2  
@anvarbek raupov: Not entirely true, the CLR-Wrappers are optional, you can bind directly to a DependencyProperty using its registered name, however if you do not do that the property should be registered with the same name as the CLR-property to avoid accidentally binding to the CLR-property which does not provide change notifications. Further the word property does not need to be used, the field name is completely arbitrary, calling it ???Property is just a convention. –  H.B. Jul 4 '11 at 16:23

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