Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a system of type traits that resides in a namespace, like so:

namespace my_namespace
{

template <typename T>
struct magic_traits
{
    static const int value = 0;
};

}

Because people hate the syntax of template specializations, I have this convenient little macro:

#define DECLARE_MY_MAGIC_TRAITS(type_, value_) \
    namespace my_namespace                     \
    {                                          \
        template <>                            \
        struct magic_traits<type_ > {          \
            static const int value = value_;   \
        };                                     \
    }

}

My problem is that this only works for declarations made in the global namespace, so traits for a type in some other namespace looks like this:

DECLARE_MAGIC_TRAITS(other_namespace::some_type, 9)

That's great, if people know about all the little namespace rules about where DECLARE_MAGIC_TRAITS belongs. If they don't and put the declaration in their own namespace, they'll get errors like:

'magic_traits' is not a template!
Specialization of non-template 'other_namespace::my_namespace::magic_traits'

Which are quite confusing to a new user of your library!

Is there a way to make that macro be able to define a specialization of magic_traits from anywhere? If that is not possible (as I suspect): What techniques can be used to generate more reasonable error messages?

I should note that my users are mostly Python programmers and have very little C++ experience, so anything I can do to make their lives easier, the better.

share|improve this question
3  
+1 for a clear question –  Flexo Jul 4 '11 at 15:09
3  
If they're writing C++, the best thing you can do to make their lives easier, is make them learn C++. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 4 '11 at 15:09
    
You want a macro that does "closes all open namespaces, do stuff, and reopen all the namespaces"? –  Kerrek SB Jul 4 '11 at 15:16
2  
@Martinho: Indeed. But you have to learn an awful lot of C++ to understand WTF type traits do, and what the corresponding syntax means! –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 4 '11 at 15:18
    
@Oli: But typically you shouldn't be required to define new type traits unless you were fairly familiar with your project and the language -- tangential users shouldn't need to have to add traits, I suppose. –  Kerrek SB Jul 4 '11 at 15:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Maybe a bit ugly, but how about this as an idea :

namespace my_namespace
{

typedef bool The_DECLARE_MY_MAGIC_TRAITS_macro_should_be_used_in_the_global_namespace;

template <typename T>
struct magic_traits
{
    static const int value = 0;
};

}

#define DECLARE_MY_MAGIC_TRAITS(type_, value_) \
    namespace my_namespace {                   \
        typedef The_DECLARE_MY_MAGIC_TRAITS_macro_should_be_used_in_the_global_namespace CheckPrecondition; \
        template <>                            \
        struct magic_traits<type_ > {          \
            static const int value = value_;   \
        };                                     \
    }

When the macro is used incorrectly, it would generate an error such as this :

error: ‘The_DECLARE_MY_MAGIC_TRAITS_macro_should_be_used_in_the_global_namespace’ does not name a type
error: ‘magic_traits’ is not a template
error: explicit specialization of non-template ‘other_namespace::my_namespace::magic_traits’

That might give enough of a hint as to what's wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem here is the multiple declaration issue: CheckPrecondition will already be defined if there is more than one DECLARE_MY_MAGIC_TRAITS in a single compilation unit. This can be worked around with some BOOST_PP_COUNTER magic. –  Travis Gockel Jul 4 '11 at 19:32
3  
@Travis : maybe I'm misunderstanding you, but unlike in C, in C++ it's perfectly valid to have the same typedef appear more than once in the same scope. Or to say it with the words of the standard : In a given non-class scope, a typedef specifier can be used to redefine the name of any type declared in that scope to refer to the type to which it already refers. –  Sander De Dycker Jul 4 '11 at 21:35
    
Haha, you're right. Stupid switching between multiple languages gets me all messed up. –  Travis Gockel Jul 4 '11 at 21:37
    
@Travis : Not sure if I'd actually use this suggested approach in production code though ... it's a nice "trick" for template meta programming, but maybe it should stay in that niche heh. I agree with what others have mentioned that education of the users is probably the way to go (either through documentation, a C++ course, ...) –  Sander De Dycker Jul 4 '11 at 21:45

There is probaly nothing better than good documentation.

You should tell the users of your DECLARE_MAGIC_TRAITS macro where to put the macro, and what to write inside the parameters (with examples)

And make the error messages a faq entry so that users will find a good answer to what went wrong.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.