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This

newtype ( Show a , Show b , Show c ) => T a b c = T Int
t :: T a b c -> a -> b -> c -> String
t ( T x ) a b c = show a ++ show b ++ show c

gives me an error:

No instance for (Show c)
      arising from a use of `show'
    In the second argument of `(++)', namely `show c'
    In the second argument of `(++)', namely `show b ++ show c'
    In the expression: show a ++ show b ++ show c

But this

newtype ( Show a , Show b , Show c ) => T a b c = T Int
t :: ( Show a , Show b , Show c ) => T a b c -> a -> b -> c -> String
t ( T x ) a b c = show a ++ show b ++ show c

compiles.

Why?

In the first case, doesn't "T a b c" already imply that "( Show a , Show b , Show c )"? Why is it necessary to explicitly specify the constraint?

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2 Answers 2

No, putting a context on a data (newtype) definition never did quite what one might expect. It only changes the type of the constructor when constructing values, nothing new happens when pattern matching. It's a basically useless feature and it has been removed in the latest version of Haskell.

What you expect is quite reasonable, but it's not what data type contexts do.

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I can understand why constraints on newtype constructors serve no purpose. But then, I'm putting the constraints on the left side of the equals... is there any reference to how that should/should-not work? I can't find anything on putting constraints on the type. –  Dingfeng Quek Jul 5 '11 at 22:19
    
For what you're doing, read the Haskell report (you may have to look at the Haskell 98 report since the feature is deprecated now). Putting the context on the constructor is a GHC extension, so consult the ghc documentation about extensions. –  augustss Jul 6 '11 at 0:57

What @augustss said is correct, however you can achieve something similar using GADTs.

{-# LANGUAGE GADTs #-}

data T a b c where
  T :: (Show a, Show b, Show c) => Int -> T a b c

t :: T a b c -> a -> b -> c -> String
t (T x) a b c = show a ++ show b ++ show c

In most cases, however, putting the constraint on the function is the right thing to do.

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