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i found this code online and im trying to compile it, but gcc keeps on telling me that there is a undefined reference to WinMain@16. i have no idea where it is coming from, so im going to post the entire code. after searching online, i have only found answers where people wrote int main() wrong, and fixing it made it work. That doest work in this code.

/*
 * The GOST 28147-89 cipher
 *
 * This is based on the 25 Movember 1993 draft translation
 * by Aleksandr Malchik, with Whitfield Diffie, of the Government
 * Standard of the U.S.S.R. GOST 28149-89, "Cryptographic Transformation
 * Algorithm", effective 1 July 1990.  (Whitfield.Diffie@eng.sun.com)
 *
 * That is a draft, and may contain errors, which will be faithfully
 * reflected here, along with possible exciting new bugs.
 *
 * Some details have been cleared up by the paper "Soviet Encryption
 * Algorithm" by Josef Pieprzyk and Leonid Tombak of the University
 * of Wollongong, New South Wales.  (josef/leo@cs.adfa.oz.au)
 *
 * The standard is written by A. Zabotin (project leader), G.P. Glazkov,
 * and V.B. Isaeva.  It was accepted and introduced into use by the
 * action of the State Standards Committee of the USSR on 2 June 89 as
 * No. 1409.  It was to be reviewed in 1993, but whether anyone wishes
 * to take on this obligation from the USSR is questionable.
 *
 * This code is placed in the public domain.
 */

/*
 * If you read the standard, it belabors the point of copying corresponding
 * bits from point A to point B quite a bit.  It helps to understand that
 * the standard is uniformly little-endian, although it numbers bits from
 * 1 rather than 0, so bit n has value 2^(n-1).  The least significant bit
 * of the 32-bit words that are manipulated in the algorithm is the first,
 * lowest-numbered, in the bit string.
 */


/* A 32-bit data type */
#ifdef __alpha  /* Any other 64-bit machines? */
typedef unsigned int word32;
#else
typedef unsigned long word32;
#endif

/*
 * The standard does not specify the contents of the 8 4 bit->4 bit
 * substitution boxes, saying they're a parameter of the network
 * being set up.  For illustration purposes here, I have used
 * the first rows of the 8 S-boxes from the DES.  (Note that the
 * DES S-boxes are numbered starting from 1 at the msb.  In keeping
 * with the rest of the GOST, I have used little-endian numbering.
 * Thus, k8 is S-box 1.
 *
 * Obviously, a careful look at the cryptographic properties of the cipher
 * must be undertaken before "production" substitution boxes are defined.
 *
 * The standard also does not specify a standard bit-string representation
 * for the contents of these blocks.
 */
static unsigned char const k8[16] = {
    14,  4, 13,  1,  2, 15, 11,  8,  3, 10,  6, 12,  5,  9,  0,  7 };
static unsigned char const k7[16] = {
    15,  1,  8, 14,  6, 11,  3,  4,  9,  7,  2, 13, 12,  0,  5, 10 };
static unsigned char const k6[16] = {
    10,  0,  9, 14,  6,  3, 15,  5,  1, 13, 12,  7, 11,  4,  2,  8 };
static unsigned char const k5[16] = {
     7, 13, 14,  3,  0,  6,  9, 10,  1,  2,  8,  5, 11, 12,  4, 15 };
static unsigned char const k4[16] = {
     2, 12,  4,  1,  7, 10, 11,  6,  8,  5,  3, 15, 13,  0, 14,  9 };
static unsigned char const k3[16] = {
    12,  1, 10, 15,  9,  2,  6,  8,  0, 13,  3,  4, 14,  7,  5, 11 };
static unsigned char const k2[16] = {
     4, 11,  2, 14, 15,  0,  8, 13,  3, 12,  9,  7,  5, 10,  6,  1 };
static unsigned char const k1[16] = {
    13,  2,  8,  4,  6, 15, 11,  1, 10,  9,  3, 14,  5,  0, 12,  7 };

/* Byte-at-a-time substitution boxes */
static unsigned char k87[256];
static unsigned char k65[256];
static unsigned char k43[256];
static unsigned char k21[256];

/*
 * Build byte-at-a-time subtitution tables.
 * This must be called once for global setup.
 */
void
kboxinit(void)
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
        k87[i] = k8[i >> 4] << 4 | k7[i & 15];
        k65[i] = k6[i >> 4] << 4 | k5[i & 15];
        k43[i] = k4[i >> 4] << 4 | k3[i & 15];
        k21[i] = k2[i >> 4] << 4 | k1[i & 15];
    }
}

/*
 * Do the substitution and rotation that are the core of the operation,
 * like the expansion, substitution and permutation of the DES.
 * It would be possible to perform DES-like optimisations and store
 * the table entries as 32-bit words, already rotated, but the
 * efficiency gain is questionable.
 *
 * This should be inlined for maximum speed
 */
#if __GNUC__
__inline__
#endif
static word32
f(word32 x)
{
    /* Do substitutions */
#if 0
    /* This is annoyingly slow */
    x = k8[x>>28 & 15] << 28 | k7[x>>24 & 15] << 24 |
        k6[x>>20 & 15] << 20 | k5[x>>16 & 15] << 16 |
        k4[x>>12 & 15] << 12 | k3[x>> 8 & 15] <<  8 |
        k2[x>> 4 & 15] <<  4 | k1[x     & 15];
#else
    /* This is faster */
    x = k87[x>>24 & 255] << 24 | k65[x>>16 & 255] << 16 |
        k43[x>> 8 & 255] <<  8 | k21[x & 255];
#endif

    /* Rotate left 11 bits */
    return x<<11 | x>>(32-11);
}

/*
 * The GOST standard defines the input in terms of bits 1..64, with
 * bit 1 being the lsb of in[0] and bit 64 being the msb of in[1].
 *
 * The keys are defined similarly, with bit 256 being the msb of key[7].
 */
void
gostcrypt(word32 const in[2], word32 out[2], word32 const key[8])
{
    register word32 n1, n2; /* As named in the GOST */

    n1 = in[0];
    n2 = in[1];

    /* Instead of swapping halves, swap names each round */
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[0]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[1]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[2]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[3]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[4]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[5]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[6]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[7]);

    n2 ^= f(n1+key[0]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[1]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[2]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[3]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[4]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[5]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[6]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[7]);

    n2 ^= f(n1+key[0]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[1]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[2]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[3]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[4]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[5]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[6]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[7]);

    n2 ^= f(n1+key[7]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[6]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[5]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[4]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[3]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[2]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[1]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[0]);

    /* There is no swap after the last round */
    out[0] = n2;
    out[1] = n1;
}


/*
 * The key schedule is somewhat different for decryption.
 * (The key table is used once forward and three times backward.)
 * You could define an expanded key, or just write the code twice,
 * as done here.
 */
void
gostdecrypt(word32 const in[2], word32 out[2], word32 const key[8])
{
    register word32 n1, n2; /* As named in the GOST */

    n1 = in[0];
    n2 = in[1];

    n2 ^= f(n1+key[0]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[1]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[2]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[3]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[4]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[5]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[6]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[7]);

    n2 ^= f(n1+key[7]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[6]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[5]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[4]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[3]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[2]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[1]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[0]);

    n2 ^= f(n1+key[7]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[6]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[5]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[4]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[3]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[2]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[1]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[0]);

    n2 ^= f(n1+key[7]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[6]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[5]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[4]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[3]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[2]);
    n2 ^= f(n1+key[1]);
    n1 ^= f(n2+key[0]);

    out[0] = n2;
    out[1] = n1;
}

/*
 * The GOST "Output feedback" standard.  It seems closer morally
 * to the counter feedback mode some people have proposed for DES.
 * The avoidance of the short cycles that are possible in OFB seems
 * like a Good Thing.
 *
 * Calling it the stream mode makes more sense.
 *
 * The IV is encrypted with the key to produce the initial counter value.
 * Then, for each output block, a constant is added, modulo 2^32-1
 * (0 is represented as all-ones, not all-zeros), to each half of
 * the counter, and the counter is encrypted to produce the value
 * to XOR with the output.
 *
 * Len is the number of blocks.  Sub-block encryption is
 * left as an exercise for the user.  Remember that the
 * standard defines everything in a little-endian manner,
 * so you want to use the low bit of gamma[0] first.
 *
 * OFB is, of course, self-inverse, so there is only one function.
 */

/* The constants for addition */
#define C1 0x01010104
#define C2 0x01010101

void
gostofb(word32 const *in, word32 *out, int len,
    word32 const iv[2], word32 const key[8])
{
    word32 temp[2];         /* Counter */
    word32 gamma[2];        /* Output XOR value */

    /* Compute starting value for counter */
    gostcrypt(iv, temp, key);

    while (len--) {
        temp[0] += C2;
        if (temp[0] < C2)       /* Wrap modulo 2^32? */
            temp[0]++;      /* Make it modulo 2^32-1 */
        temp[1] += C1;
        if (temp[1] < C1)       /* Wrap modulo 2^32? */
            temp[1]++;      /* Make it modulo 2^32-1 */

        gostcrypt(temp, gamma, key);

        *out++ = *in++ ^ gamma[0];
        *out++ = *in++ ^ gamma[1];
    }
}

/*
 * The CFB mode is just what you'd expect.  Each block of ciphertext y[] is
 * derived from the input x[] by the following pseudocode:
 * y[i] = x[i] ^ gostcrypt(y[i-1])
 * x[i] = y[i] ^ gostcrypt(y[i-1])
 * Where y[-1] is the IV.
 *
 * The IV is modified in place.  Again, len is in *blocks*.
 */

void
gostcfbencrypt(word32 const *in, word32 *out, int len,
           word32 iv[2], word32 const key[8])
{
    while (len--) {
        gostcrypt(iv, iv, key);
        iv[0] = *out++ ^= iv[0];
        iv[1] = *out++ ^= iv[1];
    }
}

void
gostcfbdecrypt(word32 const *in, word32 *out, int len,
           word32 iv[2], word32 const key[8])
{
    word32 t;
    while (len--) {
        gostcrypt(iv, iv, key);
        t = *out;
        *out++ ^= iv[0];
        iv[0] = t;
        t = *out;
        *out++ ^= iv[1];
        iv[1] = t;
    }
}


/*
 * The message suthetication code uses only 16 of the 32 rounds.
 * There *is* a swap after the 16th round.
 * The last block should be padded to 64 bits with zeros.
 * len is the number of *blocks* in the input.
 */
void
gostmac(word32 const *in, int len, word32 out[2], word32 const key[8])
{
    register word32 n1, n2; /* As named in the GOST */

    n1 = 0;
    n2 = 0;

    while (len--) {
        n1 ^= *in++;
        n2 = *in++;

        /* Instead of swapping halves, swap names each round */
        n2 ^= f(n1+key[0]);
        n1 ^= f(n2+key[1]);
        n2 ^= f(n1+key[2]);
        n1 ^= f(n2+key[3]);
        n2 ^= f(n1+key[4]);
        n1 ^= f(n2+key[5]);
        n2 ^= f(n1+key[6]);
        n1 ^= f(n2+key[7]);

        n2 ^= f(n1+key[0]);
        n1 ^= f(n2+key[1]);
        n2 ^= f(n1+key[2]);
        n1 ^= f(n2+key[3]);
        n2 ^= f(n1+key[4]);
        n1 ^= f(n2+key[5]);
        n2 ^= f(n1+key[6]);
        n1 ^= f(n2+key[7]);
    }

    out[0] = n1;
    out[1] = n2;
}

#ifdef TEST

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

/* Designed to cope with 15-bit rand() implementations */
#define RAND32 ((word32)rand() << 17 ^ (word32)rand() << 9 ^ rand())

int
main(void)
{
    word32 key[8];
    word32 plain[2];
    word32 cipher[2];
    int i, j;

    kboxinit();

    printf("GOST 21847-89 test driver.\n");

    for (i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
        for (j = 0; j < 8; j++)
            key[j] = RAND32;
        plain[0] = RAND32;
        plain[1] = RAND32;

        printf("%3d\r", i);
        fflush(stdout);

        gostcrypt(plain, cipher, key);
        for (j = 0; j < 99; j++)
            gostcrypt(cipher, cipher, key);
        for (j = 0; j < 100; j++)
            gostdecrypt(cipher, cipher, key);

        if (plain[0] != cipher[0] || plain[1] != cipher[1]) {
            fprintf(stderr, "\nError! i = %d\n", i);
            return 1;
        }
    }
    printf("All tests passed.\n");
    return 0;
}

#endif /* TEST */

what should I do to get this code to run?

share|improve this question
2  
In mingw32? Link it with -mno-windows. –  Kerrek SB Jul 4 '11 at 16:37
    
The komment by @Kerrek gives incorrect and silly advice. He has not looked at the code. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 4 '11 at 17:02
1  
What Windows version did we have in 1993? Could something have changed since? –  Bo Persson Jul 4 '11 at 17:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The main function is compiled conditionally. To make this source code work as a program, you need to put

#define TEST

somewhere before the #ifdef TEST directive (better in the beginning of the file, so it's visible).

share|improve this answer
    
While I agree that main is #ifdefed out of this code this alone does not solve his problem. –  Vitor Jul 4 '11 at 16:48

You don't have a main function. You may be missing one of the original source files. You simply add one.

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) 
{
    return 0;
}

And it should compile and link fine.

UPDATE: Just noticed..

You already have a main gaurded by the macro

 #ifdef TEST

just add

#define TEST 1

and it will compile and link fine. see this it works.

share|improve this answer
    
nope :( ideone.com/wIU0f –  calccrypto Jul 4 '11 at 16:41
    
@calccrypto: check updated answer. –  Alok Save Jul 4 '11 at 16:47

You're targeting the Windows subsystem therefore you need to supply a WinMain as a entry point, not main. If targeting the Windows subsystem if really what you intended then you can just hand off a simple WinMain calling your main. Like this:

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, PSTR pCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
{
    PARAM_UNUSED(hInstance);
    PARAM_UNUSED(hPrevInstance);
    PARAM_UNUSED(nCmdShow);

    int argc;

    PCHAR* argv = CommandLineToArgvA(pCmdLine, &argc);

    return main(argc, argv);
}

The CommandLineToArgvA implementation can be found here.

Beware that command line arguments on this simple implementation doesn't work like the in the stdlib version: argv[0] is the first parameter, not the application name and there's no ending NULL on argv.

If targeting Windows is not what you intended look for a -mwindows in the gcc command line and remove it. Based on @Kerrek SB helplful comment on your question, add -mno-windows to the command line. If you have trouble doing it, post more information about your building environment and we will be able to help.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 "You're targeting the Windows subsystem therefore you need to supply a WinMain as a entry point, not main" is incorrect. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 4 '11 at 16:53
    
@Alf P. Steinbach How so? Please enlighten me. –  Vitor Jul 4 '11 at 16:55
    
"How so?" well it's just plain false, not true, incorrect, as I wrote. You can and should use a standard C and C++ main for a C or C++ program, no matter GUI or console subsystem. With g++ you don't have to do anything special, but with MSVC (silly toolchain) you may need to specify entry point as linker option /entry:mainCRTStartup. Cheers & hth., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 4 '11 at 16:58
    
@Alf P. Steinbach This is the default option for the MSVC toolchain and it's a valid answer on this context. I deeply disagree that you should use the standard main on this context: you should use wherever is most idiomatic to the platform you're working on. Cheers :) –  Vitor Jul 4 '11 at 17:01
    
you don't have to suck blood just because billions of flies do. There is no good reason to use a non-standard startup function that just requires you to do more, and even has an unused argument (the second one). Just as there is no good reason to write non-standard void main: more to write, no advantage. If it's idiomatic among your colleagues to use the silly function that requires them to do more and is non-standard, then enlighten them. Cheers & hth., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 4 '11 at 17:05

The main function for Windows applications is called WinMain. Just change main to:

int CALLBACK WinMain(HINSTANCE, HINSTANCE, LPSTR, int) { ... }

and you should be good to go.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Uh oh. No no no. First, it's the wrong fix for this program (he should just define TEST), and secondly, no, it's not the case that the main function for Windows applications is called WinMain. That's just an archaic C and C++ start-up function that the C and C++ toolchins have to support for historical reasons. E.g. it's not there in Pascal. :-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 4 '11 at 16:53

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