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Let's say I have this table:

<table class="live_grid">
    <tr>
        <td>
            <h3>Something!</h3>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

If I want to style the <h3> within the table, I can use this CSS selector:

.live_grid h3 {}

This works fine. The trouble pops up if I want to style all headings in that table. I have tried this:

.live_grid h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 {}

This seems to match headings that are not within my table with the class of live_grid.

I'm sure this is a simple problem and right in front of me. Can you point out what I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
If your HTML is structured such that there's a pattern you can select by when picking headings, e.g. headings are always the first children of each td in the first tr, you can do something like .live_grid tr:first-child > td > :first-child. Pseudo-classes are a fun experimental tool ;) –  BoltClock Jul 5 '11 at 3:04

9 Answers 9

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Selector Groups (Selector Lists)

If you want to style all the headers in that class, you have to do it like this:

.live_grid h1, .live_grid h2, .live_grid h3, .live_grid h4, .live_grid h5, .live_grid h6 {
    /* style here */
}

In order to share a style declaration between several selectors, the CSS specification allows for a comma-separated list of selectors to be used rather than a single selector. There is no mention of grouping selectors in a way that would allow, e.g., the descendant combinator, such as is used here, to group its arguments together in the same way; therefore each selector in the list must be defined as an independent selector - hence the need to reference the class again.

Example:

#myDiv1, .live_grid, #myDiv2 {
    color: blue;
}

This would set the text-color for everything in the #myDiv1 element, everything in the #myDiv2 element, and everything in the .live_grid element to having text color blue.

This also explains the reason your CSS is matching all the headers - you're referencing them individually, separated by commas - there is no selector for their containing element(s).

[N.B.: When using a list of selectors, be sure that all your selectors are valid according to the rules of CSS, as it also specifies that, in the case of an invalid selector within the list, the entire declaration is to be considered invalid, and thus would be skipped in such a case, even if there were other, valid, selectors in the list.]

LESS or SASS

Another alternative would be to use a CSS pre-processor (such as LESS), or a CSS extension (such as SASS) which would allow you to, instead, write nested rules that would look something like this:

.live_grid {
    h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6 {
        /* style here */
    }
}

(Of course, always be sure to weigh the benefits of something like this against the costs—keeping in mind that adding something new and unfamiliar might cost more developer time to learn the technology than you will be saved for what amounts to (in this case) a typing shortcut. Also, be sure to evaluate whether there are any operational issues for your product such as: whether your intended targets will support it [especially when that will include any custom software], whether your rendering time or latency will be adversely affected, etc.)

The CSS Specification

When you need to know why something isn't working as you expected, keep in mind that you may be able to quickly find the definitive answer by searching the specification. (It is always possible that the specification may be ambiguous or vague on a particular point, in which case there might not be a definitive answer, however this should be very rare, especially in published versions.)

The relevant details for this particular case (selectors separated by commas) can be found in the latest CSS3 selectors specification [Selectors Level 3, section 5]; although all versions have been in agreement on grouping. (For other versions see: [CSS1 section 1.2], [CSS21 section 5.2.1] and, for CSS4, [Selectors Version 4, Section 4.1].)

CSS4

Should your target support it [ed. note: I tested on Internet Explorer 10.0.9200.16798 with Update 10.0.13 (KB2909921), Firefox Aurora 29.0a2 (2014-02-08), Opera 20.0.1387.77, and Chromium 35.0.1884.0 (256156), none of which support this method] the CSS4 specification gives one further possibility, assuming it remains as part of the spec.

The pseudo class 'matches-any' is defined in _Selectors Level 4, section 4.2 ([version at time of writing, 'W3C Working Draft 2 May 2013'], [current version]) and would allow you to write this to achieve the desired result:

.live_grid :matches(h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6) { /* style definition */ }

The CSS4 working draft currently defines two different profiles—'fast', and complete'—with the matches-any pseudo-class defined on both profiles for what CSS4 calls 'compound selectors' (defined in [Selectors Level 4, section 3.1]). However, 'complex selectors' (which are defined to include combinators, "the reference combinator", and "the subject indicator") currently require the 'complete' profile, so should you be using :matches() on complex combinators in a target that supports them, you will still need to ensure that the targets will be operating in 'complete' mode.

[Section 2.1, Issue 1] of the CSS4 working draft does mention that removing the restriction on (non-reference) combinators is under consideration, so you can always check the latest revision of the spec to see if anything has changed.)

share|improve this answer
    
Of course! I'm an idiot. Thanks Dave, and everyone else who answered. –  Brad Jul 4 '11 at 16:40
.live_grid h1,
.live_grid h2,
...

you get the idea

share|improve this answer

Try this one:

.live_grid h1,
.live_grid h2,
.live_grid h3,
.live_grid h4,
.live_grid h5,
.live_grid h6 {}
share|improve this answer

Unfortunately, you'll need to target each heading separately, or just assign a class to it.

.live_grid h1,
.live_grid h2,
.live_grid h3,
.live_grid h4,
.live_grid h5,
.live_grid h6 {
}

I would just assign a class to the heading, or be specific about which headings you actually want to target.

share|improve this answer

The code

  .live_grid h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 {}

will only select the h1 that is with in .live_grid. Use

.live_grid h1,.live_grid h2,.live_grid h3,.live_grid h4,.live_grid h5,.live_grid h6 {}

We can think of the comma as a logical OR operator, but it’s important to remember that each selector in a group is autonomous. A common beginner’s mistake is to write groups like this:

#foo td, th {
⋮ declarations
}

A beginner might think that the above declaration block will be applied to all td and th elements that are descendants of the element with an ID of "foo". However, the selector group above is actually equivalent to this:

#foo td {
⋮ declarations
 }
th {
⋮ declarations
}

To achieve the true goal, write the selector group as follows:

 #foo td, #foo th {
 ⋮ declarations
 }

Read This

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1  
"The code will only select the h1 that is with in .live_grid" as well as every h2, h3, h4, h5 and h6. –  BoltClock Jul 5 '11 at 3:02

each heading tag has to be qualified:

.live_grid h1, .live_grid h2, .live_grid h3, .live_grid h4, .live_grid h5, .live_grid h6
share|improve this answer

That's one of the things that sucks about css. If you want css to suck less you can use http://sass-lang.com/ and it will look like:

.live_grid {
  h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6 {
    /* styles here */
  }
}
share|improve this answer
 .live_grid h1,
 .live_grid h2,
 .
 .
 .

 .live_grid h6 { //now add your style here }
share|improve this answer

another solution could be to add to your html markup a special class for every h element you want.

and then, in your css , you can write somthing like that:

 .live_grid .myHeader
  {
        /* your styling */
  }
share|improve this answer

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