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#include<stdio.h>
main
{
    int x[]={1,2,3,4,5};
    int i,*j;
    j=x;
    for(i=0;i<=4;i++)
    {
        printf("%u",j);
        j++;
    }
}

output:

65512
65514
65516
65518
65520

But when I change the printf to"

printf("%u",&j[i]);

Output is:

65512
65516
65520
65524
65528

Why the address differ by 2 in first case and 4 in second casee?

What is wrong with just printing j and printing &j[i]?

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, just to make it clear, you are printing the pointer j, and not the pointed value, *j

Now, regarding the printed address. In your second example:

for(i=0;i<=4;i++)
{
  printf("%u",&j[i]); 
  j++;

&j[i] equals to (j+i). i is incremented in each iteration, which contributes 2 to the pointer's value, and j is incremented too, which contributes another 2.

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@lgor Oks "j" is also an address and "&j[i]" is also an address only know.. i am printing those two.. why the address differs???? –  debug Jul 4 '11 at 17:28
1  
I think he was pretty clear about why the addresses differ. You are incrementing both j and i, so obviously j (your first example) will increase slower than j+i (your second example). To get the same output as your first example, you'd want &j[0]. –  Aaron Dufour Jul 4 '11 at 20:39
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You get jumps of 4 in the second example because you are incrementing j and offsetting by i! Both of these contribute a difference of 2.

Note also that printf is not type-safe; it is up to you to ensure that the arguments match the format-specifiers. You have specified %u, but you've given it an int *, you should use %p for pointers.

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@Oli Charlesworth sorry "j=x" i forgot this line in code.. now i updated the code check it......... –  debug Jul 4 '11 at 17:25
    
Note: some compilers can warn you about passing wrong arguments to printf, but you have to enable warnings –  Karoly Horvath Jul 4 '11 at 17:26
    
@debug: See my updated answer. –  Oli Charlesworth Jul 4 '11 at 17:27
    
@Oli Charlesworth can u get me clearly.. i understood u some what... –  debug Jul 4 '11 at 17:30
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