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I'm really pulling my hair out with this one. I've got a vbscript and I'm trying to insert a few hundred thousand records into an Access database.

Obviously, it's really slow if I do them one at a time, so I thought I might be able to bulk insert them with some sort of transaction. So I tried writing this:

set rs = CreateObject("ADODB.recordset")
 rs.Open "table", objConn,, 4

For counter = 1 to 100000
  rs.AddNew
  rs("username") = "Value"
Next

  rs.UpdateBatch

(objConn is the database connection).

The problem is I get an error saying:

"Number of rows with pending changes exceeded the limit"

and I get that when there's more than one pending change.

I guess I haven't set my transaction up correctly, but I'm a bit stuck. Don't suppose someone could point out the error of my ways? Thanks very much.

share|improve this question
    
Where do you get the records from? An external source (file?)? Or do you generate them in memory? –  Ekkehard.Horner Jul 4 '11 at 18:07
    
They're generated in memory. I could write them to a file first if you think that would help, but that doesn't feel like the right way to do this sort of thing. –  Doctor Trout Jul 4 '11 at 18:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

To argue for my proposal to use a command in a transaction, I wrote this script:

  Dim sAct      : sAct      = "trout"
  If goWAN.Exists( "a" ) Then sAct = goWAN( "a" )
  Dim nRecs     : nRecs     = 10
  If goWAN.Exists( "n" ) Then nRecs = CLng( goWAN( "n" ) )
  Dim sMFSpec   : sMFSpec   = goFS.GetAbsolutePathName( "..\data\ut.mdb" )
  Dim oConn     : Set oConn = CreateObject( "ADODB.Connection" )
  Dim oRs       : Set oRs   = CreateObject( "ADODB.Recordset" )

  Dim nRec, oCmd, nRA, aData, oParm

  oConn.Open "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0;Data Source=" & sMFSpec
  Set oRs.ActiveConnection = oConn

  oConn.Execute( "DELETE FROM tLines" )
  WScript.Echo "#Recs:", oConn.Execute( "SELECT COUNT(SampleText) FROM tLines" ).Fields( 0 )

  WScript.Echo sAct
  Select Case sAct
    Case "trout"
    Case "bob"
      oRs.CursorLocation = adUseClient
      oRs.CursorType = adOpenKeySet
      oRs.LockType = adLockBatchOptimistic    
    Case "eh"  
  End Select
  WScript.Echo "oRs.CursorLocation: ", oRs.CursorLocation
  WScript.Echo "oRs.CursorType: ", oRs.CursorType
  WScript.Echo "oRs.LockType: ", oRs.LockType
  Select Case sAct
    Case "trout", "bob"
      oRs.Open "tLines", oConn, , adLockBatchOptimistic
      For nRec = 1 to nRecs
          oRs.AddNew
          oRs( "SampleText" ) = "This is line " & nRec
      Next
      oRs.UpdateBatch
      oRs.Close
    Case "eh" 
      oConn.BeginTrans
      Set oParm = CreateObject( "ADODB.Parameter" )
      With oParm
        .Name      = "A"
        .Type      = adVarChar
        .Value     = ""
        .Direction = adParamInput
        .Size      = 100
      End With
      Set oCmd = CreateObject( "ADODB.Command" )
      With oCmd
        Set .ActiveConnection = oConn
            .CommandText      = "INSERT INTO tLines (SampleText) VALUES (?)"
            .CommandType      = adCmdText
            .Parameters.Append oParm
      End With

      ReDim aData( 0 )
      For nRec = 1 to nRecs
          aData( 0 ) = "This is line " & nRec
          oCmd.Execute nRA, aData, adExecuteNoRecords + adCmdText
      Next
      oConn.CommitTrans 
  End Select

  WScript.Echo "#Recs:", oConn.Execute( "SELECT COUNT(SampleText) FROM tLines" ).Fields( 0 )
  WScript.Echo "First:", oConn.Execute( "SELECT TOP 1 * FROM tLines" ).Fields( 0 )

  oConn.Close

called with /n:200 and /a:trout it shows:

  #Recs: 0
  trout
  oRs.CursorLocation:  2
  oRs.CursorType:  0
  oRs.LockType:  1
  ... xpl.vbs(246, 11) Provider: Number of rows with pending changes exceeded the limit.

So I think, I reproduced your problem correctly. For /a:bob:

  #Recs: 0
  bob
  oRs.CursorLocation:  3
  oRs.CursorType:  1
  oRs.LockType:  4
  #Recs: 200
  First: This is line 1
  xpl.vbs: Erfolgreich beendet. (0) [ 19.74219 secs ]

So setting

  oRs.CursorLocation = adUseClient
  oRs.CursorType = adOpenKeySet
  oRs.LockType = adLockBatchOptimistic    

as Bob (and Microsoft) adviced is one solution to your problem. To get some speed, I put an command into a transaction:

  oConn.BeginTrans
  Set oCmd = CreateObject( "ADODB.Command" )
  ...
  ReDim aData( 0 )
  For nRec = 1 to nRecs
      aData( 0 ) = "This is line " & nRec
      oCmd.Execute nRA, aData, adExecuteNoRecords + adCmdText
  Next
  oConn.CommitTrans 

Result:

#Recs: 0
eh
oRs.CursorLocation:  2
oRs.CursorType:  0
oRs.LockType:  1
#Recs: 200
First: This is line 1
xpl.vbs: Erfolgreich beendet. (0) [ 1.47656 secs ]

From 20 to 2 secs (without any properties fiddling) seems not bad to me.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh that is brilliant! Thanks very much. Really appreciate the work you put into that. My script has gone from taking so long I could make a cup of tea and come back and it would still be running to about 5 seconds. –  Doctor Trout Jul 5 '11 at 18:10

If you are using OLEDB then you need to set the CursorLocation property to adUseClient as per the following KB article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/261297

You might also consider running in smaller batches if it's slow doing 100k at a time

EDIT: yes, adUseClient needs to be defined as = 3, or just use the number 3 in it's place.

share|improve this answer
    
So I came across that article, and I tried adding in: rs.CursorLocation = adUseClient but I got an error saying that "arguments are of the wrong type, are out of acceptable range, or are in conflict with one another" and I couldn't quite figure out what was causing that. –  Doctor Trout Jul 4 '11 at 17:51
    
Actually, I think this might be the answer, but for some reason "rs.CursorLocation = adUseClient" doesn't work, instead I have to use "rs.CursorLocation = 3" - let me just test this... –  Doctor Trout Jul 4 '11 at 19:54
    
It's still slow as hell though... god I hate Access... –  Doctor Trout Jul 4 '11 at 20:26
    
Perhaps consider firing a bunch of insert statements at the database instead of using a recordset object? –  Treborbob Jul 5 '11 at 8:19

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