Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is considered typical

- (id)init {
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        // <#initializations#>
    }
    return self;
}

but wouldn't it be better to go with something like this which actually responds appropriately?

- (id)init {
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        // <#initializations#>
    } else {
       @throw [NSException exceptionWithName:NSInternalInconsistencyException reason:@"you think your constructor is executing, but it's not"] userInfo:nil]
    }
    return self;
}


The corollary to this question is, "under what conditions would [super init] return nil and shouldn't you handle that in the init method?"

share|improve this question
2  
If the initialization is a failure to the point that your app won't work anymore, best to simply crash. I.e. call abort() or use __builtin_trap instead of @throw. Throwing an exception is guaranteed to lose information about the failure. –  bbum Jul 4 '11 at 20:01
    
Thanks @bbum for entertaining the question. Good points. –  Yar Jul 4 '11 at 22:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One reason, why you should do, what JustSid is saying:

In object-orientated design you should always code, as if you maybe will hand your class over to another project by another developer. So you can't assume, that a failure in initialization in his project may be as bad as it is probably in yours. Maybe this developer is you in 5 years. Imagine your hassle to fix your 200 classes, you want to reuse.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice explanation, thanks +1 –  Yar Jul 4 '11 at 19:28

No, exceptions in Objective-C are meant for states which you can't really recover from, not just something to show that an operation failed. If you initializer fails, simply return nil to show it.

share|improve this answer
    
How can you possibly recover from the World not working the way it's supposed to. It's true that you COULD continue, but all subsequent code that's run would be meaningless, since your assumptions are blown. –  Yar Jul 4 '11 at 18:35
1  
@Yar: If you can't recover from something this simple you might want to reconsider your code. –  JustSid Jul 4 '11 at 18:36
2  
@Yar: but ObjC is relatively unique in that quite a lot of the language is established by convention, not by syntax. That creates a presumption that certain patterns will be followed, and the test for avoiding a pattern becomes a very high threshold. –  Tommy Jul 4 '11 at 18:38
    
@JustSid, sorry, the idea is that you would have some actual code where // <#initializations#> is. If it's just an empty section then you don't need the if whatsoever. –  Yar Jul 4 '11 at 19:26
2  
@Yar Well, the short answer is, yes, you should code expecting alloc/init (as well as copy and just about anything else) to return nil. The longer answer is the unfortunately tautological -- you should care only if you care. If the state of your program absolutely depends on something not being nil and you cannot at all recover it is OK to throw an exception, only you do it wherever it matters, e.g.: MYBar* foo = [[MYBar alloc] initWithData:someData]; NSAssert(foo != nil, @"Can't continue like this."); –  Lurch Jul 7 '11 at 18:50

Not really.

with:

self = [super init];

you are calling your superclasses init method, which only in RARE cases will return nil. (like if the system has low memory, which you have other problems).

if(self)

this will not go through if no instance is returned (it is nil) so there is no need for the else.

the old way was

if((self = [super init))
{
    // do initialization
}
return self

EDIT: Was reading the Cocoa Fundementals guide and found this under Error Handling:

If the error encountered in a method implementation is a system-‐level or Objective-‐C runtime error, create and raise an exception, if necessary, and handle it locally, if possible. In Cocoa, exceptions are typically reserved for programming or unexpected runtime errors such as out-‐of-‐bounds collection access, attempts to mutate immutable objects, sending an invalid message, and losing the connection to the window server. You usually take care of these errors with exceptions when an application is being created rather than at runtime. Cocoa predefines several exceptions that you can catch with an exception handler. For information on predefined exceptions and the procedure and API for raising and handling exceptions, see Exception Programming Topics.

For other sorts of errors, including expected runtime errors, return nil, NO, NULL, or some other type-‐suitable form of zero to the caller. Examples of these errors include the inability to read or write a file, a failure to initialize an object, the inability to establish a network connection, or a failure to locate an object in a collection. Use an NSError object if you feel it necessary to return supplemental information about the error to the sender. An NSError object encapsulates information about an error, including an error code (which can be specific to the Mach, POSIX, or OSStatus domains) and a dictionary of program-‐specific information. The negative value that is directly returned (nil, NO, and so on) should be the principal indicator of error; if you do communicate more specific error information, return an NSError object indirectly in a parameter of the method.

share|improve this answer
    
Gunman, there in the middle you hit it on the head. "if the system has low memory"... wouldn't you want an Exception to be thrown there, which where the problem happened? –  Yar Jul 4 '11 at 19:30
    
Could you not just log it in that case? –  Myron Slaw Jul 4 '11 at 19:55
    
Your logger might have a problem too, in that case. It doesn't alloc-init objects? –  Yar Jul 4 '11 at 22:07
    
Added the conventions (that apply to your question) to my answer from the Error handling section of the Cocoa Fundamentals guide. –  Myron Slaw Jul 5 '11 at 4:35
1  
Sending a message to nil doesn't crash your program, it does nothing. I'm not sure if you are asking weather people actually use the if((self = [super init])); convention or doing some kind of nil check outside of the init method. If the former, I'd say yes mainly because templates usually set that up for you ^^. –  Myron Slaw Jul 5 '11 at 14:55

Returning nil is the appropriate thing to do. Part of the reason that sending any message to nil is allowed and defined to return nil as a result is that you can build compound statements like:

resultObject = [[[[class alloc] init] autorelease] someProperty];

That statement executes all the way through even if any individual method call returns nil. To fit with that, the init convention is to return the nil if the superclass does so.

As JustSid points out, ObjC uses exceptions only for unrecoverable problems.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.