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I've always programmed on C++ and Pascal and think too imperatively. So, could anyone help me with the question:

Consider we have the following input pattern:

integer n
n strings
other data

For example:

2
foo
bar
3 4
and so on.

So, I need to read only n Strings into a List, without reading other data. How should I do that without for-like constructions?

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1  
can you specify more - do you want to read n strings from commandline or file - there's a great tutorial of reading and handling files haskell.org/haskellwiki/Haskell_IO_for_Imperative_Programmers –  epsilonhalbe Jul 4 '11 at 19:46
    
@epsilonhalbe From a commandline. Thanks for tutorial. –  karlicoss Jul 4 '11 at 19:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One possible method is

getLines n = sequence $ replicate n getLine

getLine is an IO action that reads a line from the standard input and returns it as a string. Its type is IO String.

replicate n creates a list of n identical items. So replicate n getLine is a list of n IO actions, each returning a string: [IO String].

sequence is a function that takes a list of actions that return something, and turns it into a single action that returns a list of that something. So if we have an [IO String], then sequence will turn it into IO [String].

Which is just what we want.

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5  
You could also use replicateM as in getLines n = replicateM n getLine. –  hammar Jul 4 '11 at 19:58
    
+1 i would have written (and have) this in a recursive function - the sequence $ replicate n … is much better, a thing to remember –  epsilonhalbe Jul 4 '11 at 20:00
    
@hammar: Thanks! Note to self: memorize contents of Contol.Monad. –  n.m. Jul 4 '11 at 20:15
    
thanks everybody :) –  karlicoss Jul 4 '11 at 20:22

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