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I'm trying to add an additional method to my 'stack' class that will return the bottom element in the stack. However.. I'm just having trouble wrapping my head around this one. This is the code I have so far in my stack.cpp, but it's not working correctly:

bool Stack::bot(StackItemType& stackBottom){
  if (isEmpty()) return false;

  StackItems *temp = top;
  while (temp != NULL) {
    temp = temp->below;
  }

  stackBottom = temp->item;
  return true;
} // end bottom

Any help ? Thank you.

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2  
Though it is reasonably clear from your code that you are using a linked list as the underling storage architecture, it would be helpful to say so. –  dmckee Jul 4 '11 at 20:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have you considered using another data structure. A stack really isn't meant to do this. However, I'm not going to be a doochebag and not answer you question.

At first glance, your code is logically sound, assuming you're implementing your stack with a linked list and adding to it pushes an element at the head of the list. The problem with your code is that temp is null the moment it leaves the while loop. Attempting to access a null pointer is an error.

If you change your while condition to use temp->below != NULL, then temp would point to a valid element before leaving the while loop.

bool Stack::bot(StackItemType& stackBottom){
  if (isEmpty()) return false;

  StackItems *temp = top;
  while (temp->below != NULL) {
    temp = temp->below;
  }

  stackBottom = temp->item;
  return true;
} // end bottom
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A stack is designed to expose only its top. It has no "bottom" as far as you are concerned. Don't use a stack if you want to access both ends of a collection! (Perhaps you'd prefer a double-ended queue or a list?)

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While this is true the question has the flavor of homework (silly requirement, an obviously homebrewed implementation, and a question that might stump a beginner); Heather may not have a choice in the matter. –  dmckee Jul 4 '11 at 20:30
1  
@dmckee: That'd be very unfortunate. The term "stack" is really quite universally accepted as a one-ended data structure in computer science, and there's simply no sensible way of finding its bottom without throwing everything else out. –  Kerrek SB Jul 4 '11 at 20:32
    
To be fair, it could just be a terminology issue. If you imagine a stack to grow downwards then the bottom would be a suitable name for the most recent item added to it. You can't tell from the question whether both ends are accessible or only one. –  tinman Jul 4 '11 at 20:55
    
@tinman: Fine, that could be, but that would mean that the current container has no method to access its end... well, it could be... –  Kerrek SB Jul 4 '11 at 21:04

I think you have to do

StackItems *temp = top;
while (temp->below != NULL) {
   temp = temp->below;
 }

But a stack is a LIFO. Here it's not :p

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No - a stack is LIFO, not FIFO –  Paul R Jul 4 '11 at 20:28
    
Yeah of course...sorry ^^ –  Genschi Jul 4 '11 at 20:29

Given that you are using a linked list as the underling storage, I would simply set the the bottom pointer every time you push to a empty stack, and unset it anytime you pop the last item.

Were you using an array (hopefully dynamic) for the underling storage you would simply index the first item.

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