Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't think is a duplicate question. There are similar ones but they're not helping me solve my problem.

According to this, the following is valid in C++:

class c {
public:
   int& i;
};

However, when I do this, I get the following error:

error: uninitialized reference member 'c::i'

How can I initialise successfully do i=0on construction?

Many thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Could you tell us more about you're real problem please? –  fulmicoton Jul 5 '11 at 7:51
    
Sounds like you want a pointer. –  Mikhail Jan 9 at 3:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

There is no such thing as an "empty reference". You have to provide a reference at object initialization. Put it in the constructor's base initializer list:

class c
{
public:
  c(int & a) : i(a) { }
  int & i;
};

An alternative would be i(*new int), but that'd be terrible.

Edit: To maybe answer your question, you probably just want i to be a member object, not a reference, so just say int i;, and write the constructor either as c() : i(0) {} or as c(int a = 0) : i(a) { }.

share|improve this answer
    
"An alternative would be i(*new int), but that'd be terrible." It wouldn't if the DTOR calls delete on that pointer. –  Constantinius Jul 4 '11 at 21:20
1  
@Constantinius: It'd still be fairly horrible even if you remembered to clean up... just think about assignments, copies, exception safety, etc... –  Kerrek SB Jul 4 '11 at 21:29
    
For example: if your class has another data member that's initialized after i, or if it has code in the body of the constructor, and that code throws an exception, then the destructor isn't called and the resource is leaked. If a class holds a resource, that really should be the only thing it does. But of course if you were designing a class to hold an int that was solely owned by that object then you wouldn't use a reference member, you'd use an int member, so this "problem" doesn't arise in practice. –  Steve Jessop Jul 5 '11 at 8:50
    
Of course not, but I assumed the int& and int* are just placeholders for more interesting entities. @Kerrek: Sure, there are many things to be thought of. But ideas like the pImpl idiom sure point out that this strategy is legitimate. Also no one would blame you for using smart pointers that are useful for exactly what you are pointing out. –  Constantinius Jul 5 '11 at 9:12

Except value like syntax, a key feature of reference is that you are pretty sure that it always point to a value.

What do you want your value to point to? If you cannot answer this question at construction, then you probably need a pointer.

share|improve this answer

A reference must be initialised to refer to something.

int a;
class c {
public:
   int& i;
   c() : i (a) {};
};
share|improve this answer

References have to be initialized upon creation. Thus you have to initialize it when the class is created. Also you have to provide some legal object to reference.

You have to use the initializer in your constructor:

class c {
public:
   c(const int& other) : i(other) {}
   int& i;
};
share|improve this answer
1  
That's a terrible terrible thing to do. –  fulmicoton Jul 4 '11 at 21:16
    
Dangling reference to temporary? –  Kerrek SB Jul 4 '11 at 21:17
    
I was just editing, I know :) –  Constantinius Jul 4 '11 at 21:17
    
you should add another const then. –  fulmicoton Jul 4 '11 at 21:18
1  
@poulejapon: It would not prevent dangling reference to temporary. –  Puppy Jul 4 '11 at 21:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.